HPV- Are You At Risk?

As common as the common Cold

What is HPV?

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that is spread by skin to skin contact with someone who is infected. HPV is normally spread through sexual activities such as anal sex, oral sex, and vaginal sex. It is as common as the common cold because around 80% of people will get HPV at some point in their lives. Some people will show symptoms while other may not.

Symptoms

Symptoms are usually bumps or warts found around the mouth penis, anus, cervix, scrotum, groin, thigh, or the vagina. Sometimes these symptoms will arise for a small period of time and go away on their own. If they do not go away than it may indicate a more serious problem like cancer. If symptoms do not go away than go see a doctor for for treatment.

How to prevent HPV

The GARDASIL vaccine protects against 4 types of HPV including cancerous ones for both males and females. It is given in 3 doses over a period of 6 months and will decrease your chances of being infected with HPV. Other ways of protecting yourself from HPV is by using a condom and having safe sex.

Who Should Get the GARDASIL Vaccine

Every child who is 11 or 12 years old should get the GARDASIL vaccine doses as well as anyone who has not gotten them when they were younger. Younger women can get the GARDASIL vaccine through age 26 and men through age 21. It is recommended that any men who are sexually active with other men through age 26 should get the vaccine.

People Who Should not get the GARDASIL vaccine

The people who should not get the GARDASIL vaccine are people who are allergic to the ingredients such as yeast.
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Possible Negative Side Effects

The side effects include swelling, pain, bruising, itching, and redness at the injection site. Along with headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and fainting. If any of these side effects occur go see a doctor for further directions.

References

1. WHAT IS HPV? (2014). Retrieved May 7, 2015, from http://www.gardasil.com/hpv-and-your-child/what-is-hpv/


2. What is HPV? (2015, January 22). Retrieved May 7, 2015, from http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/whatishpv.html


3. What is HPV? (2015, January 22). Retrieved May 7, 2015, from http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/whatishpv.html