Smallpox

WANTED: ARMED WITH PATHOGEN

Smallpox: A Deadly and Dangerous Virus

THE VIRUS

The virus itself is typically dumbbell shaped and around 200 to 400 nano-meters in size.

Smallpox is extremely contagious and can be deadly. It is transmitted through the respiratory tract. It contains DNA. It will cause high fever, headache and flu like symptoms for the first week before developing a very bad rash. If not treated by this point, get immediate help. After the first week of symptoms, the virus is most contagious and deadly.

HOW the virus attacks

The virus cell first attaches it self to a normal healthy host cell. Once inside the cell, it rapidly replicates in the host cells cytoplasm. The replicated virus will then exit the host cells membrane to then go and infect more healthy host cells and spreads throughout your body and it respiratory tract. This virus contains DNA.


Common Syntoms

THIS VIRUS IS CONTAGIOUS BY INHALING DROPLETS OF SILVIA OR FACE TO FACE CONTACT AND SKIN CONTACT

  • Server skin rash
  • Blistering in the skin
  • Elevated bumps on the skin
  • High Fever
  • Lesions of the skin
  • Back ache
  • Flu like symptoms


Victims

No certain type of person is more likely to get smallpox. The only people who are at higher risk are people that handle the virus, if your family member, friend, or someone in close range to you has it. Your genes or physical traits have nothing to do with your danger of catching the disease. However if you live in a very unsanitary and crowded home or community your risk is higher because disease and sickness will spread faster.


JUST HOW DEADLY?

There are two types of the smallpox virus, the first is called Variola Major which will kill around 30% of the infected people. The Second type is called Variola Minor which will only kill about 1% of the infected people.

Treatment

Smallpox can be prevented through use of the smallpox vaccine. If an infected person gets the smallpox vaccine within 4 days of exposure, it may significantly reduce smallpox symptoms or even prevent it. However if infected, the only known treatment is supportive treatment. This means that there is no known effective treatment for smallpox. The infected patient should be cared for by these recommendations:
  • The patient should be isolated until all scabs have fallen off (about 3-4 wk after rash development) to prevent transmission of the variola virus (smallpox virus)

  • The fluid and electrolyte balance should be monitored to avoid dehydration

  • Medications should be given for fever and pain

  • Good nutritional support should be maintained

  • Skin care should be instituted