BHES Instructional Coach Update

Month of September 2016

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Important Updates

Best Practices

Using Text Dependent Questions to Improve Close Reading Skills

Close readings are an instructional strategy that promotes deep thinking as students reread and critically examine a text (Fisher & Frey, 2012). However, students do not automatically reread. Thus, teachers need to create and use text-dependent questions that redirect students to the text to provide evidence and support for their answers (Fisher, Frey, & Lapp, 2012). Teachers should prepare text-dependent questions in advance of the reading, considering questioning techniques such as question-answer relationships, questioning the author, and Bloom’s taxonomy to ensure deep thinking is achieved. While initial questions in a close reading may focus on the literal level, in subsequent readings questions require more advanced thinking. Across readings, questions should progress through general understanding, key details, vocabulary/text structure, author’s purpose, inferring, and forming arguments (Fisher & Frey, 2012; Fisher, Frey, & Lapp, 2012).


Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2012). Close reading in elementary schools. The Reading Teacher, 66(3), 179-188.


Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Lapp, D. (2012). Text complexity: Raising rigor in reading. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Task of the Week

Text DEERpendency!!!

ELAGSE3RI1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.


Read the following paragraph and then answer both parts of the question below.


If you were to put on your brightest red sweater and stand very still in front of a deer, it might not even notice you. That is because deer are color blind. Those big, soft brown eyes see the world in shades of gray—a little like watching a black-and-white television set. To the deer, you would be just another grayish pattern in the forest. But move—even just blink your eye—and a deer, with its excellent ability to spot movement, will see you.


Part 1: Which of the following should you do if you do NOT want a deer to see you?

A. Wear a sweater

B. Stay frozen in place

C. Blink your eyes

D. Walk away slowly


Part 2: Which sentence from the box above gave you the most help in finding your answer?

A. “If you were to put on your brightest red sweater and stand very still in front of a deer, it might not even notice you.”

B. “That is because deer are color blind.”

C. “Those big, soft brown eyes see the world in shades of gray—a little like watching a black and white television set.”

D. “To the deer, you would be just another grayish pattern in the forest.”

E-mail me to get the complete solution to the Task of the Week!

Upcoming Events

Grade 4 PLC Meeting

Wednesday, Sep. 21st, 11:45am-2pm

Humphries Classroom

Our Instructional Practices Protocol will guide our agenda. We will work with Phoenix to create unit pre- and post-tests and STAR to create customized groups and set goals for individual students.

IB Reauthorization Visit

Thursday, Sep. 22nd, 8am to Friday, Sep. 23rd, 2:15pm

2257 Bollingbrook Drive Southwest

Atlanta, GA

The school will undergo re-authorization for the International Baccalaureate Program for two days.

Grade K / Grade 2 PLC Meeting

Thursday, Sep. 22nd, 8-11:45am

King Classroom

Our Instructional Practices Protocol will guide our agenda.

Grade 5 PLC Meeting

Thursday, Sep. 22nd, 11:45am-2pm

Hummings Classroom

Our Instructional Practices Protocol will guide our agenda.

Grade 1 PLC Meeting

Friday, Sep. 23rd, 8-11:45am

Hendricks Classroom

Our Instructional Practices Protocol will guide our agenda.

Grade 3 PLC Meeting

Friday, Aug. 26th, 11:45am-2pm

Callands Classroom

Our Instructional Practices Protocol will guide our agenda. Jan Dickerson, our Educational Technology Specialist, will discuss the Google Classroom.

Data Team Meeting

Tuesday, Sep. 27th, 3-4:30pm

Media Center

We WILL meet monthly to plan the following school wide data initiatives….


Semester 1…


  • Text Study about data notebooks
  • Revise the standards-based progress reports
  • Pilot data notebooks
  • Review and monitor STAR data