Tennessee Valley Authority

Established in 1933

Who was the program intended to help?

The Tennessee Valley Authority was intended to help support southern men in the South.

What was the Tennessee Valley Authority was intended to do?

The Tennessee Valley Authority was intended to help reduce floods, deforestation, and eroded land. They did this by teaching people better farming, replanting, and rebuilding. The Tennessee Valley Authority also helped generate and sell surplus electricity and conserve power.

Images of the Tennessee Valley Authority

Does this program fall under the Relief, Recovery, or Reform program of Roosevelt's New Deal? Explain

We feel that the Tennessee Valley Authority is a relief program because the Tennessee Valley Authority is making the South feel relieved by giving them jobs, helping fix problems in the South, and making a better life for the people.

How successful do you believe the Tennessee Valley Authority was at relieving the economic crisis?

The Tennessee Valley Authority was very successful at relieving the economic crisis.

How does this program add to your understanding of the Great Depression?

The Tennessee Valley Authority helps us understand that not only did it help the southerners get electricity, but also helped decrease chances of death from diseases. Also, the program replanted the forest, built sewages, and overall helped the South.
The Tennessee Valley Authority still exists today and is now expanded around the world to help people with power, flood control,navigation, and land management.
History Brief: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

The Tennessee Valley Authority

  • This video explains how the TVA helped people with important needs.
  • They built hydroelectric dams to get power for the South.
  • They built sewages to cause less diseases in the population.
  • The TVA stopped wildfires, re grew forest's.

The TVA was established by Franklin D. Roosevelt to help give jobs to a lot of southerners to help upgrade the South with power, electricity, sewages, deforestation, and farming.