Industrial Revolution Project

Sewing Machine

Who is the inventor? Is there a second inventor who made improvments on the original invention?

Original and Following Inventors: Barthélemy Thimonnier,

Elias Howe & Isaac Merrit Singer.

Where and When did this invention occur?

An early sewing machine was designed and manufactured by Barthélemy Thimonnier of France in 1841 to mass-produce uniforms for the French Army.

Why was there a need for this invention?

The sewing machine revolutionized the manufacture of clothing by creating the new industry of ready-made clothes, and it improved innumerable other industries, including boot and shoe making, carpeting, bookbinding, hosiery, and upholstery. Today, specialized sewing machines serve a host of industrial functions. Sergers, for example, sew a seam, trim it back, and wrap thread around the raw edge all in one step to create a durable, finished seam commonly seen in factory-produced garments.

How does this invention work?

A sewing machine stitches materials together using a needle and thread. It is important both as a home and an industrial appliance. Because it made possible the mass manufacture of reasonably priced ready-made clothing, the sewing machine relieved many women of one of their most demanding, time-consuming domestic chores--manually sewing all of the family's clothing.

Why is this invention important to history?

It is important both as a home and an industrial appliance. Because it made possible the mass manufacture of reasonably priced ready-made clothing, the sewing machine relieved many women of one of their most demanding, time-consuming domestic chores--manually sewing all of the family's clothing.

Why was there a need for this invention?

the sewing machine industry was his company's masterful use of merchandising, which brought the machine into thousands of households around the world.

What was the purpose of this invention?

The sewing machine revolutionized the manufacture of clothing by creating the new industry of ready-made clothes, and it improved innumerable other industries, including boot and shoe making, carpeting, bookbinding, hosiery, and upholstery. Today, specialized sewing machines serve a host of industrial functions. Sergers, for example, sew a seam, trim it back, and wrap thread around the raw edge all in one step to create a durable, finished seam commonly seen in factory-produced garments.

Citations.

Conover, Mary E.

"Sewing machine." World Book Advanced. World Book, 2014.Web.

4 Feb. 2014.

"Sewing machine." World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Student Resources in Context. Web. 5 Feb. 2014.Document URL
http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCV1647500688&v=2.1&u=copp00443&it=r&p=GPS&sw=w&asid=1bcaa5ea40789222b0a144f06babc78b