February Book of the Month

Counting on Katherine by Helaine Becker

Big picture

About the book

This is the amazing true story of mathematical genius, Katherine Johnson, whose love of learning took her all the way to NASA. Despite many obstacles put in her path, Katherine persevered and made enormous contributions to history along the way.


All students will listen to the story with their class but if you'd like to hear the story at home, watch the video.

Counting On Katherine Johnson Hidden Figures Read Aloud

Now it's your turn to LAUNCH A ROCKET!

About the challenge

All Cannon students are invited to create a Stomp Rocket at home and test it at school in a grade level competition.


In person students will test their rocket during specials. Remote students will have the opportunity to sign up for a time to come up to campus and test their rocket.


The finalists can make improvements to their rockets and then compete one more time to find out which flies the farthest distance.

TO PARTICIPATE, PLEASE FILL OUT THE GOOGLE FORM FOR YOUR CHILD

Materials

  • One piece of 1-inch PVC pipe approximately 11 inches long--to be used only to shape the body of the rocket
  • One piece of 8 1/2 X 11 inch construction paper
  • One manila file folder or other lightweight cardboard
  • cotton balls or small styrofoam ball to close off the top of the rocket (optional)
  • Masking tape
  • Scissors

Instructions

IMPORTANT: STUDENTS DO NOT NEED TO MAKE THE LAUNCHER. STUDENTS ARE ONLY BUILDING THE ROCKET. THE STOMP LAUNCHER WILL BE PROVIDED AT SCHOOL.


  1. Roll the construction paper around the PVC pipe to form a tube. Tape to hold it together. consider making your rocket fuselage (body) longer or shorter depending on the design you want. NOTE: do not wrap the paper too tightly around the PVC pipe. It needs to be able to slide off and on
  2. Take the PVC pipe out.
  3. Cut triangles out of the manila file folder and tape them to the bottom part of the tube to create stabilizing fins. How many fins will you use? 3, 4, or a different number? NOTE: You can also try using other materials and other shapes for your fins. How else could you stabilize your rocket?
  4. Decide how you will close off the top of your rocket. You can put tape over the tube, tape a styrofoam ball across the top, use a piece of the manila folder to form a cone, or come up with your own design.


DO YOU WANT EXTRA POINTS ON YOUR COMPETITION SCORE??


NASA comes up with names for each of their rockets and logos, or picture designs, to go with that name. You will get extra points added to your distance score if your rocket has a name and logo AND you are able to talk about your design. Be creative! what will your rocket be named and what will the logo look like?


Click the link to watch a video on making a stomp rocket. REMEMBER- students are only building the rocket not the launcher.

Important Dates--Dates have changed due to winter weather

February 1-5: Listen to the story with your teacher


February 10: Remote students pick up supply kits between 8am-6pm

Week of Feb. 22-26: in person learners that need to use a piece of pvc pipe will do so in class. The remainder of the supplies they requested will be sent home.

February 24: Remote students who have not yet picked up their kits need to pick up on this date between 8am-6pm


March 2: In person students test their rockets in specials

March 3: Remote students test their rockets between 8am-2pm (you must sign up for a time slot)

March 5: The top 2 students from each grade level will compete in the finals

  • Remote learners will retest their rocket in the finals between 8am-12pm (there will be a sign up later)
  • in person learners will retest their rocket in the finals at 2pm. All in person participants will be invited to attend the socially distanced rocket finals

Remote Learners- Sign up for a time on March 3 to come test your rocket!

Need Some Inspiration? Check out the historic launch of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969

Apollo 11 launches, beginning epic journey to the moon

Now compare that to the Space X and NASA launch from May 30, 2020

Launch Recap: NASA and SpaceX fly Astronauts to the Space Station