Resources For Your Mid-Term Project

A collection of links and tips that can help you create!

Your mid-term project must demonstrate your ability to use the grammar and vocabulary from lessons 1 through 7!

Shoutout to Daniel, Marques & Sonya! They've ALL submitted their projects already!

  1. This project will reflect all of the language you learned in lessons 1 through 7, including vocabulary, grammar, and expressions.
  2. You will create one slide in your presentation for each lesson.
    ★ Each slide will include 4 sentences demonstrating your knowledge of the use of the grammar and vocabulary learned in each lesson.
    ★ Each slide will include an image representing the topic as reflected in your sentences.
    ★ Each slide will include an audio recording(s) of you saying each sentence you have created.
  3. All sentences that you record for your audio MUST BE TYPED in your presentation. The letters should be in black(or a dark color!) so your presentation can be read clearly.
  4. Refer to the rubric to help you.
  5. Post your final project by 11:59 PM on the due date.

  6. Your entire project must be in Japanese (NO ROMAJI and NO ENGLISH)

MORE DETAILED DIRECTIONS ARE FOUND IN THE COURSE UNDER THE LINK "COURSE PROJECTS"

☆Tip: Review the Project Rubric

If you want to know how you'll be graded on your project, review the rubric.

☆Tip: Not sure how to pronounce something? Try Forvo.com!

Forvo.com is a database of recordings of native and non-native speakers SAYING words in Japanese (and other languages!) If you aren't sure how to say a word, you can search for it on this site!


http://www.forvo.com/languages/ja/


HINT: You will need to search for the word IN Japanese - Romaji will not work!

Quizlet - Vocabulary

Quizlet Vocabulary for lessons 1 through 7


Use the Flashcards, Learn, Speller, and Test features to study and practice each lesson's vocabulary - the more familiar you are with words, the more apt you will be to actually use them in your writing. Review them now!


Lesson 1: http://quizlet.com/_1469r4

Lesson 2: http://quizlet.com/_l78fy

Lesson 3: http://quizlet.com/_155h03

Lesson 4: http://quizlet.com/_fn1h6

Lesson 5: http://quizlet.com/_fxbv0

Lesson 6: http://quizlet.com/_ga1s5

Lesson 7: http://quizlet.com/_gkvs3

☆Tip: Review the Lesson Videos!

In every Lesson, there are videos with Sakura and Daichi that demonstrate how to use the target vocabulary and grammar for that lesson. If you're not sure how to use some grammar, review the video for that lesson. It also has a script below it, so you can see an example of how to write that grammar.


Watch them and review your vocabulary and grammar usage!


How to Cite an Image

If you are using an image found in Google Images or any other image retrieval service, be certain to cite the image in its original context. Do not provide the URL of the enlarged image - you must use the URL of the page where the image was originally shown.

Typing "google images" as your citation is not at all acceptable!!

Include all of the following steps whenever possible to cite your image properly:

1) Image creator's last name, first name, if available, or page author's name if available, followed by a period and a space
2) Title of photo followed by a period, in quotation marks. If no title, describe briefly within quotation marks.
3) Descriptive word (photo, map, cartoon, drawing, etc,) followed by a period and a space
4) Website title in italics, followed by a space
5) Website publication date in DD Mo. YYYY format followed by a period and a space
6) Date image was viewed (when YOU viewed it) in DD Mo. YYYY format followed by a space
7) Web address in angle brackets, followed by a period

Example:
Suzuki, Lea. "Mick Jaggar." Photo. SFGate.com 14 Nov. 2005. 14 Nov. 2005
<http://www.sfgate.com>.


Remember, if you don't know any one piece of information for your citation, just leave it out. Don't waste your time hunting for the name of the person who took the photo. Just try to be as complete as possible.

☆Tip: Check your Feedback!

Check your feedback on assignments and quizzes so you're not making the same mistakes over and over on your mid-term projects!

Not sure how to check your feedback? Watch the video below:

Some examples of Mid-Term Projects

The below are some EXAMPLES of projects students have created in the past.


One student included her image citations information on the slides powerpoint document.


BUT...if you would like to make a separate citation slide, go for it!

this one has a couple of spelling errors, but it was a pretty creative video project! ↓

And now, an inspirational pokémon (^_-)-☆

Big image

☆ がんばってください! ☆