The Foundation Of Our Goverment

The Constitution

What Are They About: Preamble and The VII Articles of the Constitution

The Preamble and the seven articles are what make up the Constitution and they each have a different purpose for being included in this document.

The purpose of the Preamble is to introduce the ideas that are included in the document in brief descriptions and to describe government in the words of our Founding Fathers. The Preamble states that the power that the government possesses comes from the people. The Preamble states the purposes of government: to unite the states into a united union, make sure that everyone is judged and treated equally, and to ensure no more fighting among ourselves.

Article I (Article 1) gives a brief description of our lawmaking branch of government, the Legislature, better known as Congress. This Article also goes into describing how congressmen are chosen and what laws that must followed when making a law. Article I also includes something called the Necessary and Proper Clause. This clause states the "implied powers" of Congress, which aren't stated directly in the Constitution but implied logically.

Article II (Article 2) gives a brief description of our law enforcing branch of our government, the Executive Branch. This Article goes into detail about how the President and Vice-President are elected and removed, also the powers of the President are described more precisely.

Article III (Article 3) gives a brief description of our law interpreting branch of our government, the Judicial Branch. This Article also goes into detail about the powers of the federal courts and the cases that can and can not be heard by them.

Article IV (Article 4) gives a brief description of the relationship between state and national government. This Article goes into detail about to admit new states into the nation and that the national government will protect every state within the nation.

Article V (Article 5) gives a brief description of how the Constitution can be amended or changed.

Article VI (Article 6) gives a brief description of how the Constitution is the "Supreme Law of the Land." The Supremacy Clause goes into more detail about the how laws and treaties made the national government become "Supreme Law of the Land." The Supremacy Clause is included for another reason, to help settle disagreements when the state and national governments have conflicts over laws that are in place.

Article VII (Article 7) gives a brief description of how the Constitution was to be ratified or approved. According to Article VII, nine of the thirteen states had to ratify the Constitution for it become official.