By Allie Rylander

Osgood-Schlatter

What is Osgood-Schlatter

Osgood-Schlatter is a injury that occurs from the over use of your patellar tendon. The tendon is connected to the shin bone ( also known as the Tibia) and your kneecap ( also known as your Patella) . Over use of this tendon causes it to pull away from the shinbone. The stress of the tendon pulling away cause tenderness around the area which is also where the bump will be.

Sign and Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter are:

  • Swelling of the knee
  • A bump forming below the knee cap
  • Pain while running or walking
  • Tenderness around the bump
  • Painful when kneeling

Who can be affected by Osgood-Schlatter?

Osgood-Schlatter is very common for kids who are very active. Kids between the age 8-15 are the most common to have this. 20% of athletes today have Osgood-Schlatter. 1/5 basketball players have this disease in one of their knees. There is no ethnicity targeted and both boys and girls can have the chance of getting this.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Being evaluated by a doctor is the best way to figure out if you have Osgood-Schlatter. In some cases you might have to get an X-Ray on your knee. The treatment that a doctor may recommend would be to stay off for a couple weeks and to ice a lot. Also stretching may help with the pain and tenderness

Treatments for Athletes

If the athlete would like to still play sports they can try cross training. Cross training is when you

Body Systems Affected

Osgood-Schlatter may affect the muscular and skeletal systems. The muscular system is affected by the over used tendon, and the skeletal system is affected by the tendon connected to the growth plate. Also the patella and shin bone. Before you get this disease both systems work fine and normal.
Osgood Schlatters Disease - How To Treat Osgood Schlatters Knee Injury

Prognosis

When you have this disease it can last for 6-24 months, or till you stop your rapid growth spurts. Even though you may not have the disease in your knee anymore, you might have the bump on your knee.


Bibliography


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Board, A.D.A.M. Editorial. Osgood-Schlatter Disease. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 11 Dec. 2012. Web. 18 Dec. 2013.

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"TeensHealth." Osgood-Schlatter Disease. Teen Health, Apr.-May 2011. Web. 20 Dec. 2013.

"Osgood Schlatter Disease." CNN. Cable News Network, n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2013.

"Osgood-Schlatter Disease." Student Resource Center - Health Module. Gale, n.d. Web. <http://web.ebscohost.com/src/detail?sid=587a8c8e-9da4-4fa1-823b-de7f5f6ddd5e%40sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4104&bdata=JnNpdGU9c3JjLWxpdmU%3d#db=hxh&AN=36252674>.

Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Definition." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 19 Mar. 2011. Web. 18 Dec. 2013.