Types of Play

BY: Ellie Buchanan

Solitary Play

when the child is alone and maintains focus on its activity. Such a child is uninterested in or is unaware of what others are doing. More common in younger children (age 2–3) as opposed to older ones.


Age: (2-3)


Learning to play independently


cooking, coloring, puzzels

Parallel Play

is a form of play in which children play adjacent to each other, but do not try to influence one another's behavior. Children usually play alone during parallel play but are interested in what other children are doing. This usually occurs after the first birthday.


Age: (2-3)


Usually play alone but are interested in another child's play.


Blocks

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Associative Play

According to Parten, as children became older, improving their communication skills, and as opportunities for peer interaction become more common, the nonsocial (solitary and parallel) types of play become less common, and the social (associative and cooperative) types of play become more common.


Age: (2-3)


They start talking to other children their age


House, Musical Chairs

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Cooperative Play

cooperative play involves the division of efforts among children in order to reach a common goal. This is not an innovative idea, though one might think so given grading systems and sports rankings that seem more concerned with where children stand among their peers.


Age: (2-3)


They are trying to reach a common goal


Soccer, baseball, basketball, football

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