Refugees

Syrian Refugees

Where did refugees came from?

It's estimated that everyday 32,000 men, women and children are forced to leave their countries because of wars and violence. More than half of the refugees right now came from Afghanistan, Syria and Somalia.

Increased of Syrian Refugees

Afghanistan still remains the country with the highest refugees in 33 years, having 2, 56 million refugees. But it's expected that the number of Syrian refugees will overtake Afghanistan refugees, having 2,47 million in 2013 and it's still growing.

Timeline

2011

  • As the uprising starts, in May it was estimated that more than 300 refugees cross into Turkey.
  • By May more than 1,000 refugees fled to Lebanon in just 10 days.
  • In June the total of refugees in Turkey and Lebanon was more than 10,000
  • In November 7,600 more refugees went to Turkey, and 5,000 more in Lebanon.
  • Other refugees who were not accepted in Turkey and Lebanon went to Jordan and Libya instead.

2012


  • Jordan opens up a camp for 3,000 refugees however it receive 80,000 refugee arrival.
  • By December the number of refugees jump to 750,000. 135,519 in Turkey, 8,852 in Iraq, 54,000 in Iraqi Kurdistan, 150,000 in Lebanon, 142,000 in Jordan, and 150,000 in Egypt.
  • In August the first 124 Syrian refugees arrive in Italy, (Europe).

2013

  • In August 2013, 4,600 refugees arrive in Italy.
  • Then in September Sweden, Brazil and Argentina offered an asylum to homeless refugees.
  • By the end of the year up to 1.5 million Syrians fled from their homes.

2014

  • By then end of August 2014, 6.5 million people has been displaced in Syria and more than 3 million has fled to countries like Lebanon, Turkey, and Jordan.

2015

  • More than 100,000 refugees cross Europe in July.
  • By September over 8,000 refugees cross cross Europe daily.
  • By December more than 500,000 Syrian refugees entered Europe and 80% of them arrived by sea.

2016

  • Many Syrian refugees are stranded in Greece, because many Central European countries have refuse to receive Syrian refugees, while other Western European countries lessen the number of people who can enter their country.

Why did Syrians fled home?

  • Syrian Civil War: the war caused so much violence and since it began 320,000 people were killed, and 12,000 of them are children. Also more than 1.5 million Syrian citizens were injured, wounded or permanently disabled. The war has become more deadly when ISIS started to cause terror attacks and when foreign powers joined in.
  • Economy: Syria's economy has been destroyed. The countries education, healthcare and systems and infrastructure has been destroyed by the war.
  • Children Safety: since the war no one has been safe including children. Children are at risk of being involved in the war, many of them has lost their families, education and safety. Children are also most vulnerable of exploitation.

Where do refugees go?

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Turkey host the highest Syrian Refugees accepting 1.9 million of Syrians who fled home.

Syrian refugees usually go to neighboring countries such as Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. 10% of Syrian refugees attempt to travel to Europe.

What are their needs?

  • Basic needs: such as shelter, food, clothing, health assistance, and household and hygiene items, as well as clean water and sanitation facilities.
  • Children needs safety and to have the right to go to school.
  • Employment options for adults, in order for them to sustain their families' needs independently.

Recent news about refugees

  • There are 4.1 million registered refugees from Syria.
  • Countries like Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Israel, Qatar, Greece, Italy, US, Australia, Germany, Sweden, and Britain are countries that promised to offer asylum for Syrian refugees.
  • There are over 25,000 refugees that arrived in Canada in February.
  • Countries who accepts Syrian refugees are now restricting refugees to enter their countries and rejecting and deporting large number of Syrians because the number of refugees trying to cross borders has gotten out of control and still increasing.