Mangrove

By Eddie Medina,Miles Ennis,Jose Torres,Karlos Baez

Water Pollution

  • Herbicides, oil spills, and other types of pollutants may kill mangroves

Causing tremendous damage to mangroves, herbicides, oil spills, and other types of water pollution may result in the death of these plants. Mangroves are very susceptible to herbicides as demonstrated in South Vietnam by the U.S. military by the defoliation and destruction of over 250,000 acres (1,012 square kilometers) of mangroves.

Oil spills cause damage to mangroves by coating roots, limiting the transport of oxygen to underground roots. Mangrove communities including invertebrates, fishes, and plants are also highly susceptible to damage from petroleum products.

Urban Development

  • Urban development of areas in and near mangroves results in the destruction of this habitat as well as other associated wetland habitats

Responsible for total loss of mangrove habitat in some locations, urban development includes the construction of buildings and canal system

Urban Development

  • Urban development of areas in and near mangroves results in the destruction of this habitat as well as other associated wetland habitats

Responsible for total loss of mangrove habitat in some locations, urban development includes the construction of buildings and canal system

Red Mangrove

Red mangroves, which are broad-leaved evergreen trees, are easily identified by their remarkable above ground prop roots which transport air to their waterlogged below ground roots.

Black Mangroves

The black mangrove, is a species of flowering plant in the acanthus family, Acanthaceae. It grows in tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts