Human Trafficking

How does it affect a person mentally/physically?

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Background

Human trafficking occurs in over 130 countries around the world. It is when a person is "subjected to labor exploitation, sexual exploitation, or both." Studies show that approximately 79% of the trafficked people are trafficked for sexual purposes. Human trafficking also often includes the removal of organs. According to The Early Show, "Human trafficking is a low-risk, high-profit enterprise, and because it looks to the casual observer--and even to cops--like garden-variety prostitution, it is tolerated." The International Labor Organization has estimated that approximately $44.3 billion is made for human trafficking annually. It has been estimated by the Polaris Project that about 18,000 people are trafficked every year in the U.S..

Effects

  • Post-Trauma Stress Disorder
  • Drug Abuse
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • "short- and long-term physical injuries, disabilities"
  • High possibility of having HIV
  • panic disorder
  • eating disorder
Survivor Story

Sabine's Story

Survivor Story

Samantha's Story

Conclusion

In conclusion, human trafficking affects a person mentally/physically in many ways and greatly too. Being brought into it can cause Post-Trauma Stress Disorder(PTSD), the action of drug abuse, anxiety, depression, panic disorders, and eating disorders. There is also a high possibility of having HIV's and if the victim was physically abused, which happens in many cases, the victim could have physical injuries and disabilities. The stated effects could take a very long time to diminish, such as the PTSD. Also, HIV is a serious disease that could eventually lead to AIDS if not treated. Overall, human trafficking affects a victim greatly, and not in the good way. I believe that human trafficking should be prevented as much as it can because it can affect all of us.

Bibliography

Butcher, Simon. "Poverty Is Only One Factor Contributing to Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Poverty and Human Trafficking: Myth Busting." Stopthetraffik. 2011. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.


Clawson, Heather J., Ph. D., Amy Salomon, Ph. D., and LIsa Goldblatt Grace, LICSW MPH. "Treating the Hidden Wounds: Trauma Treatment and Mental Health Recovery for Victims of Human Trafficking." ASPE. ASPE, 23 Nov. 2015. Web. 09 Dec. 2015.


Human Trafficking. Digital image. Victim Witness Services Coconino County. Victim Witness Services, n.d. Web. 18 Dec. 2015.


"Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Christina Fisanick. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2010. Current Controversies. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 9 Dec. 2015


Petriliggieri, Francesca. "Poverty Is the Root Cause of Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Trafficking in Human Beings and Poverty." Coatnet.com. 2012. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 15 Dec. 2015.


"Survivor Story: Genocide Survivor to Labor Trafficking Victim." Polaris. Polaris, 31 Jan. 2015. Web. 18 Dec. 2015.


United Nations Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking. "Human Trafficking Is Caused by the Greed of Criminals." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Human Trafficking: Background on Trafficking Risk Factors." 2012.Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2015.


United Nations. An Introduction to Human Trafficking: Vulnerability, Impact and Action. New York: UN Office on Drugs and Crime, 2008. PDF.


UNODC. "United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime." What Is Human Trafficking? United Nations, n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2015.