Stonehenge, England

By: Alexis Ferns

Short Description

Stonehenge is a circle like shape of stones that stand up straight and have been there since 3100 B.C. Inside of the circle of these standing stones are four tall standing stones that are parallel to each other. They also all have the same shape. Each of the four stones is shaped somewhat like pi. Around the four stones are smaller stones. The smaller stones seem to be very, very tiny compared to the rest of the stones.

^Stonehenge From Above^

^Archaeologists Looking For Ash^ Remains At Stonehenge

Short History

Stonehenge is a very old and important place to many people. It's been said that they think it was built from 3100 B.C. to 1500 B.C. In 2008 they said that the first stones were put there from 2400 B.C. to 2200 B.C. Some of the people studying Stonehenge, had a different theory saying Bluestones might have been there in 3000 B.C. Some archaeologists say that it is one of the richest archaeological places in England.



This sacred place is also the best known pre-historic monument in England. Some people say from different resources and studies that it is in the middle of several hundred burial mounds. For a long time people, scientists, and archaeologists have been a little confused by Stonehenge and its secrets. Stonehenge was also believed to have been created in the Neolithic Age. There are roughly 100 standing stones.



Location

Stonehenge is located in southwestern England. It is on the Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England. It is believed by archaeologists that Stonehenge was part of a big ceremonial center. Today it is a popular tourist attraction in England.


^Druids Ceremony After Pilgrimage^

Why Stonehenge is Sacred?

Scientists believe that Stonehenge was used for religious purposes. They think the ceremonies preformed there were linked to the summer and winter solstices and the rising and setting of the sun and moon. These would happen at the start of summer and winter.


Evidence that was found suggests that Stonehenge was a burial ground. Cremated remains found there show that they were of humans from as early as 3000 B.C. People continued to bury others there for another 500 years. The Druids consider Stonehenge a place important to their religion and they have pilgrimages there. The Druids believe in the harmony and worship of nature and respect for all beings and the environment.


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The World Book Encyclopedia. 2009 ed. Vol. 18. Chicago, IL: World Book, 2009.