John Adams

Federalist Party

John Adams Federalist Party

The Federalist party was one of the first two political parties in the United States, and thus in the world. It originated, as did its opposition, the Democratic-Republican party, within the executive and congressional branches of government during George Washington’s first administration (1789-1793), and it dominated the government until the defeat of President John Adams for reelection in 1800. Thereafter, the party unsuccessfully contested the presidency through 1816 and remained a political force in some states until the 1820s. Its members then passed into both the Democratic and the Whig parties.
Big image

#FederalistRuler

John Adams Federalist Party POV

John Adams for reelection in 1800. Thereafter, the party unsuccessfully contested the presidency through 1816 and remained a political force in some states until the 1820s. Its members then passed into both the Democratic and the Whig parties.

John Adams Leadership qualities

Before he became the second president of the United States, John Adams established himself as a successful lawyer. He was known for defending the British soldiers who participated in the Boston Massacre as well as serving in the Continental Congress before the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War

John Adams Foreign Policies

he Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, passed into law following revelation of the XYZ Affair, were designed to protect Americans from foreign insurgents. The four laws lengthened the residency requirement for citizenship, limited the number of new voters (who tended to vote Democratic-Republican), allowed for the president to deport or detain non-citizens insofar as they threatened national security, and banned subversive communication. Many hundreds of non-citizens fled from such unwelcome practices. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison challenged the legitimacy of the Alien and Sedition Acts with their Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, and opposition to the laws helped Jefferson to unseat Adams as president in the 1800 election. Congress repealed or let lapse the four laws during Jefferson's first term

John Adams Domestic Policies

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, passed into law following revelation of the XYZ Affair, were designed to protect Americans from foreign insurgents. The four laws lengthened the residency requirement for citizenship, limited the number of new voters (who tended to vote Democratic-Republican), allowed for the president to deport or detain non-citizens insofar as they threatened national security, and banned subversive communication. Many hundreds of non-citizens fled from such unwelcome practices. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison challenged the legitimacy of the Alien and Sedition Acts with their Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, and opposition to the laws helped Jefferson to unseat Adams as president in the 1800 election. Congress repealed or let lapse the four laws during Jefferson's first term.