Entertainment in 1950's

Victoria C, Alejandra G, Jayleen P, Yesenia E

Drive in Movies

  • Drive in movies were a big attraction in the 50's, although the first drive-in-movie theater opened in 1933.
  • The popularity spiked after WWII

Popular Movies In 50's

  • Harvey (1950)
  • Ace In The Hole (1951)
  • Rififi (1955)
  • Rio Bravo (1959)
  • Strangers on a Train (1951)
  • Ben-Hur (1959)

Music Industry

Elvis Presley

  • Elvis Aaron Presley was an American singer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as "the King of Rock and Roll", or simply, "the King".
  • Died: August 16, 1977

Top Tracks By Elvis Presley

  • Falling in Love With You
  • Blue Suede Shoes
  • My Way
  • Hound Dog
  • Heartbreak Hotel

Movies Broadcast-ed on TV

  • Cinderella- Is the only Rodgers and Hammerstein musical written for television. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 as a vehicle for Julie Andrews, who played the title role.
  • Wizard of Oz- An estimated 45 million people were able to see The Wizard of Oz when the film was first shown on CBS television on November 3, 1956. As big a success as that broadcast was, the network didn't rerun it until December 13, 1959, this time to an even larger audience.
  • Pinocchio- First broadcast was in February, 1940

Popular Toys in the 1950's

Big image
As soon as Barbie was introduced to the public, her mature body horrified many adult females. Mothers said they would not allow their child to play with Barbie because they were wary of her sex appeal. Mattel conducted a study with mothers and daughters before they introduced Barbie. Barbie's sexy clothing disgusted many of the women. One mother said, "I wouldn't walk around the house like that. I don't like that influence on my little girl. If only they would let children remain young a little longer....It's hard enough to raise a lady these days without undue moral pressures" (Lord 39).

Another woman felt Barbie had too much of a figure; she was quoted as saying "I'd call them daddy dolls - they are so sexy. They could be a cute decoration for a man's bar" (Lord 39). Aside from the strong objections from parents, Mattel knew that young girls would go for Barbie in a big way. Soon with Mattel's clever marketing department, they over road the cries of mothers across the country by targeting a new consumer, children.

Radioshows

Every teenager in the 50s and 60s wanted a radio and a record player. Pop music was sold via the singles chart and record players from that era were designed to play singles. Most were able to play stack of singles one after the other. Portable radios started out as bulky affairs with valves, but eventually the transistor took over the and shirt pocket radio became the 60s equivalent of the teenage mobile phone.

Phonograph

Every teenager in the 50s and 60s wanted a radio and a record player. Pop music was sold via the singles chart and record players from that era were designed to play singles. Most were able to play stack of singles one after the other. Portable radios started out as bulky affairs with valves, but eventually the transistor took over the and shirt pocket radio became the 60s equivalent of the teenage mobile phone.

Dating

dutch dating

Back in the fifties, it was pretty much understood that boys pay for the expenses of the date. They take their girls out and show them a good time, but all of this costs money. Girls were, and some would insist still are, expensive to please especially if one takes them out frequently. The concept of Dutch dating was not acceptable back in the fifties. Both boys and girls were embarrassed by the idea. It was suggested that if a young man needed help paying for the date then the girl should give him some money before the date so the boy can still look like he paid for the meal and entertainment. This method was suggested but rarely ever practiced