Peek at the Week in Project Extra

Cami Webb

Christmas Schedule

We will have classes next week as normal.


We will start classes on January 13th but I have a Gifted Meeting on January 16th so 7th/8th grade will not meet that week.

Wow! What a Week!!!

Monday - PD Day No School


Tuesday - We began the construction of our paper version of 1940s Fulton. It is very tedious but they are looking great. Students also took a trip to Norway and met a couple of my friends who shared how Christmas is celebrated in their country. Next week they will take a new trip and light their buildings up with micro:bits. Students ended the day trying to pick supplies for their trip to the island and were left with a very important decision to make!!


Wednesday/Thursday - Middle School - We began the construction of our paper version of 1940s Fulton. It is very tedious but they are looking great. Students also took a trip to Norway and met a couple of my friends who shared how Christmas is celebrated in their country. They also received penpal letters from 7-9th grade students in Denmark that shared how they celebrate Christmas. We are working on writing them back and look forward to sharing letters in the future. Next week they will take a new trip and light their buildings up with micro:bits.


Next all students will have the opportunity to share their "Gingerbread" creations with students from all over the world. Currently we have Skypes set up with students from Lithuania, Newfoundland, Montant, and South Carolina. Working to add more!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGNnLHqdBHk&list=UUlfKvRTDcOEsvtjm2Y_m9EA&index=1

Asynchronous Development - Empathy

This time of year can be overwhelming for gifted students but not for the reasons that you think. The holidays are a time that focuses on the haves and the have nots and looking at the world through an empathetic eye. The term “empathy” is used to describe a wide range of experiences. Emotion researchers generally define empathy as the ability to sense other people’s emotions, coupled with the ability to imagine what someone else might be thinking or feeling. Empathy is important because it helps us understand how others are feeling so we can respond appropriately to the situation. It is typically associated with social behavior and there is lots of research showing that greater empathy leads to more helping personality and great leadership potential. That being said, gifted children experience things more profoundly than non-gifted children. Dabrowski felt that gifted children whose overexcitability manifests emotionally are the most prone to anxiety. Because children with emotional overexcitability (OE) tend to be incredibly empathetic (they are attuned to others’ feelings at all times) they cannot “dial down” their awareness of their environment. They struggle to focus on tasks and worry excessively at the slightest sign of strife or discord. A child with high OE does not simply care about the feelings of others and want to help—he quite literally feels what other people are feeling. He experiences other people’s emotions as though they were his own. Extreme empathy, unlike compassion, can be highly nonspecific (and therefore confusing). A gifted child may enter a room feeling perfectly calm, for example, only to find himself flooded with apprehension a moment later. He is unlikely to know where his tense feelings are coming from—he just finds himself suddenly wanting to flee from the room. Even if he can pinpoint who is experiencing the unpleasant feelings, he may find that he is more aware of the other person’s anxiety than they are.If a gifted child is instead told that his experience is unique—that not everyone is an empathizer—then he can begin to understand himself on his own terms. Often, simply having an “answer” as to why he’s feeling the way he is will reduce his anxiety.


Ultimately, your gifted child needs to be taught an “action-based” strategy for living with empathetic anxiety. He should be instructed to ask himself whose anxiety he is really experiencing and what, if anything, he can do about it. He should be told that if he cannot do anything about the situation, it’s perfectly okay to leave. Seeking space in which to regroup is not a sign of weakness. Once your child learns how to apply these constructive methods of anxiety management, he can begin to see his empathy as something productive and therefore valuable. This is, of course, the first step to becoming a confident and empowered individual.


https://www.psy-ed.com/wpblog/empathy-and-anxiety-in-gifted-children/
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Gifted Opportunities

I have put all of the opportunities into one document so that it is easier to keep track of. I have them divided into topics and I will continue to add to this as things come across my path. There are some pretty amazing things out there that I had no idea existed!! Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla looks amazing!!! If you know of any other opportunities that I can add please share!!