Ancient Roman FAQs

Cassia Gregory

Writing

The Romans did not have regular paper. They had Papyrus paper from the Papyrus plant which grew along the Nile river. The Romans glued strips of the Papyrus together into rolls and wrote with a quill dipped in ink, or a stylus. Romans also wrote on parchment, a material made from the skins of cattle, sheep, and goats.

Family

Roman families were different from modern families. They had slaves, husbands(patresfamilias) were more strict and made most of the decisions. Parents celebrated a baby birth as well. The parents could legally punish their children severely, with permission. Children were not officially acknowledged of their existence by the father until about a week after birth, because death at birth was extremely common. Roman names also were very different from modern names. They held significant meaning and denoted social status, family history and personal identity. Citizens in the upper class had longer names.
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Clothing- MEN'S AND BOYS'

Roman men and boys wore togas, until the time of the Republic only men wore them. A poor man might wear a shorter toga, and a wealthier man might wear a long one that is marked (with a design). Roman boys were demanded to wear only one piece of jewelry. Some didn't listen and wore multiple rings and brooches.
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CLOTHING- WOMEN'S AND GIRLS'

Roman women and girls wore a Stola, which indicated their marital status, social status, social class or wealth. They had relatively simple and unchanging clothing styles like the Tunic. Children wore Togas worn over a tunic. The toga was the toga praetexta with a purple border that had to be made of wool. The purple border was, at least in origin, apotropaic—that is, it protected the wearer against the Evil Eye or other unseen dangers that might attack a child.
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Citations


Writing

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Family

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Clothing

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.