Kianna and Hudson

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Family Bonds

The small viscling struggled as she fell out of her egg, rolling down a short hill before landing in a heap of dead grass. Her legs had twisted under her and she couldn’t stand. She let out a squeal and wriggled around until she lay on her back, and she was able to get herself out of pain. After a few breaths, she stood to her paws and glanced around. She made a few noises to call for her parents, but the place was silent. Her fur quivered as she wrapped her tail around herself. She was alone.


After finally accepting that nobody was coming for her, she wandered back up the hill, to where her egg was. The bright red and grey spots placed on it were a comforting sight, though it didn’t do much to help settle her shivering. The night was chillier than she would expect it to be. So she climbed into the remains of the egg, curling up against the wind. It passed over the top, but over time, Kianna was comfortable.


She was suddenly awoken as her egg started rolling, and she rolled down the hill, her head breaking through the egg and hitting the ground below. She was once again at the bottom, her egg broken to small pieces. The girl cried out and sniffed it, hiccuping as her breathing became shallow. That egg had been the only comfort she had; now it was gone, irreplaceable. She felt her face get heated and she glanced up the hill, only to see a bright blue viscling standing at the top, looking just as petrified as she did. “Hey!” she yelled, stamping her little paw on the ground. “You hurt me!”


The viscling was quiet for a while, gazing down at her with wide eyes. He looked guilty, but Kianna wasn’t ready to forgive him. But before she could say anything, he began walking down the hill sideways, his eyes focusing on the ground until he stood in front of her.


“I’m sorry,” he squeaked. His head was low, and his tail was wrapped around him as the wind gently blew past them. “I was trying to chase a bunny, and he knocked right into you and you went down. I didn’t know you were in there, elsewhere I would have chased him away.” He glanced around, seeming disappointed that the rabbit was nowhere near. “Who are you anyways?”


The female blinked for a moment, taking a step away as he came forward. Her ears went back and she held a paw up against her chest in case she needed to defend herself. “I’m…well…” She swallowed nervously. “I don’t know. When I came out of my egg, there was nobody there.” She wished she was more confident with her words.


“You need a name then.” The viscling frowned as he seemed to think, before a name came to mind. “Kianna? And you need another name too.” He took a view of their surroundings before he noticed a bush of dead roses near the water. “Rose. Kianna Rose. There was a grave I once saw with the name Kianna. It’s a nice name.”


She huffed with a scowl. “Thanks for naming me after a person that died, and dead flowers,” she retorted. But she couldn’t deny that she liked the name. It had a nice ring to it…though it was still weird that she was named by a viscet that was her age. She didn’t want to stay ‘her’ or ‘it’.


The blue viscet grinned, seeming to perk up a bit at her comment. “Names don’t matter, it’s the viscet who does.” He glanced to the sky with a frown, as the dark began to settle. “Oh, we should probably keep moving. The Aurora Borealis is going to show up soon.” He began to walk away from the girl, his mind set on the horizon.


Kianna frowned, but followed next to him. “What do the Northern Lights have to do with anything? They’re just colors in the sky.” She looked towards the horizon herself. There wasn’t much else she could do, and nobody else was providing her company. But the boy seemed content.


He flashed her a glance, a scowl on his face. “They’re my family,” he explained. “I’m Hudson Aquilo, the blue streak in the sky. I need to go meet them so that I can rejoin with them. But they like moving around a lot, so I have to stay on track so that I can be with them as soon as possible.” He flicked his tail.


Kianna was silent a moment. “Can I join your family too?” she said meekly, and the male turned to her with a smile.


“Of course! You’ll fit right in.”