Temperate Hardwood Forest

By: Gisselle Quiroga and Layla Fiedler

Temperate Hardwood Forest

Temperate Hardwood forest is a light Upland hardwood forest is a well-developed, closed-canopied forest dominated by deciduous (Of a tree or a shrub) shardwood trees on mesic soils in areas sheltered from fire. It typically has a diverse (showing a great deal of variety of very different) assemblage of deciduous and evergreen tree species in the canopy and midstory(layer of vegetation in a forest that consists of those trees whose height)

The way Temperate hardwood forest would keep clean:

Light gap succession is the driving force behind tree recruitment in upland hardwood forest and can happen at many different scales from single tree sized gaps to larger canopy(an ornamental cloth covering hung or held up over something, especially a throne or bed) openings

Representative Florida hardwood Hammocks


  • Hammock In the Red hills
  • Goldhead Branch State park
  • Little Salt Spring Myakka River State Park
  • Everglades National Park...ECT


Interesting thing about Temperate Hardwood Forest

As you can see, most of the clouds accumulate along the equator. This is what scientists call a low-pressure zone. (Clouds just can’t handle high pressure situations.) Low-pressure zones are regions of high precipitation. If you watch carefully, you can spot another low-pressure zone in the temperate latitudes.

Abiotic

Non-living things


  • Soil
  • Rocks
  • Water
  • Sinlight
  • Air
  • Rain
  • Hills
  • Temperature
  • Air Masses
  • Climate

Biotic

Living things


  • Decidious Trees
  • Birch Trees
  • Oak Trees
  • Eastern Chipmunk
  • Red Tailed Hawk
  • Least Weasle
  • White-Tailed Deer
  • Coyote
  • Carpet Moss
  • Lady Fern
  • Common Lime

What does Deciduous mean?

The term deciduous refers to the plant’s ability to lose it’s leaves when times get tough. For example, some species of trees and shrubs in the chaparral are called drought-deciduous, which means that they lose their leaves in the dry season to conserve (especially an environmentally or culturally important place or thing) water.


Deciduous trees in temperate forests lose their leaves in the fall to better survive winter conditions like extreme cold and reduced daylight. For a more detailed explanation of how trees lose and regrow their leaves, check out Rob and Jonas’ video on plant hormones here!


The ability for a tree to lose its leaves to conserve energy is a useful but costly adaptation. As opposed to evergreen trees, deciduous trees have to regrow thousands of leaves every year. This requires the plant to take precious nutrients from the soil to make them. In some temperate regions (area or division, especially part of a country or the world having definable characteristics but not always fixed boundaries), if the soil is too dry or nutrient poor to afford the cost of new leaves, the populations of plants change to suit the environment. For example, in many temperate regions of the United States, the soil is too sandy and nutrient poor to support many deciduous trees and evergreen trees are a big part of the forest. In areas like this, we call it a “temperate broadleaf mixed deciduous forest”. Yes, the names can get complicated.

Producers

Producers: Any kind of green plant. Green plants make their food by taking sunlight and using the energy to make sugar. The plant uses this sugar, also called glucose to make many things, such as wood, leaves, roots, and bark. Trees, such as they mighty Oak, and the grand American Beech, are examples of producers:Producers are any kind of green plant. Green plants make their food by taking sunlight and using the energy to make sugar. The plant uses this sugar, also called glucose to make many things, such as wood, leaves, roots, and bark. Trees, such as they mighty Oak, and the grand American Beech, are examples of producers

Consumers

Consumers: Consumers have to feed on producers or other consumers to survive. Deer are herbivores, which means that they only eat plants (Producers). Bears are another example of consumers. Black bears are omnivores and scavengers, like skunks and raccoons, which means that they will eat just about anything. In a forest community, Black Bears will eat blueberries, bugs, acorns, and many kinds of nuts. Decomposers: Decomposers are the garbage men of the animal kingdom; they take

Decomposers

Decomposers: Decomposers are the garbage men of the animal kingdom; they take all the dead animals and plants (consumers and decomposers) and break them down into their nutrient components so that plants can use them to make more food. Decomposers in the forest come in many different shapes and sizes. Shelf fungus is a fungus that grows on the sides of trees. It grows into the tree and decomposes it slowly. Have you ever been walking through the woods and come across a dead log that falls apart and is full of dirt? That is because decomposers have been eating and digesting that log for several years, turning it into dirt that is wonderful for plants