Lipids

by Austin Clark

What are Lipids?

Lipids are fats, oils, steroids, hormones, waxes and fatty acids. They are usually composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Lipids can be stored as fat, converted to skin, and then converted back to fat.

Functions of this molecule

These molecules can be used for many things. They are concentrated energy, they are building blocks of cells, they clot blood, they thicken blood, it insulates body heat, they produce hormones and even repel water.

What are different types of Lipids?

Lipids can be stored in many different ways and so many different shapes. Different examples would be fatty acids, oil, wax, fat, hormones, steroids and cholesterol

Applications to the "Real World"

Lipids also have useful functions such as scabbing, pushing the body through puberty and causing human sex drive.

Work Cited:

-"Lipids." UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C.
Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Science in Context. Web. 21 Sept.
2015.URL
<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/
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-"Lipids." World of Biology. Gale, 2006. Science in Context. Web. 21 Sept.

2015.URL
<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/
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;activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2431500368&source=Bookmark
&u=ephr84077&jsid=29aa217fa625e0bfcce33ab0fee15010>

-"Lipids." UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C.

Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Science in Context. Web. 21 Sept.
2015.URL
<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/
ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=n
ormal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=R
eference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGrou
ps=&sortBy=&search_within_results=&p=SCIC&action=e&catId=&
;activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641700137&source=Bookmark
&u=ephr84077&jsid=25583b5201f54e5254a2998ad68aab1e>