Tim Berners-Lee

British computer scientist

About Tim Berners-Lee

Full name: Timothy John Berners-Lee

D.O.B: 8th June 1955 (age 60)

Oppucation: Computer scientist

Spouse: Rosemary Leith

Birth: London, UK

Career

After graduation,Berners-Lee worked as an engineer at the telecommunications company Plessy in Poole, UK. In 1978, he joined D. G. Nash in Ferndown, Dorset, where he helped create type-setting software for printers. Berners-Lee worked as an independent contractor at CERN from June to December 1980. While there, he proposed a project based on the concept of hypertext to facilitate sharing and updating information among researchers. To demonstrate, he built a prototype system named ENQUIRE. After leaving CERN in late 1980, he went to work at John Poole's Image Computer Systems, Ltd, in Bournemouth, England. He ran the company's technical side for three years. The project he worked on was a "real-time remote prodcedure call", which gave him experience in computer networking In 1984, he returned to CERN as a fellow. In 1989, CERN was the largest Internet node in Europe, and Berners-Lee saw an opportunity to join hypertext with the Internet.

Some important people in computer science

The computer scientist of the century!

Inventions

In 1989, Berners Lee published a paper called 'Information Management: A Proposal' in which he married up hypertext with the Internet, to create a system for sharing and distributing information not just within a company, but globally. He named it the World Wide Web. He also created the first web browser and editor. The world's first website, http://info.cern.ch, was launched on 6 August 1991. It explained the World Wide Web concept and gave users an introduction to getting started with their own websites.

In 1994, Berners Lee founded the World Wide Web Consortium at the Laboratory of Computer Science (LCS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston. He has served as director of the consortium since then. He also works as a senior research scientist at LCS which has now become the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

Interesting fact!

He has admitted that the pair of slashes (//) in web addresses ended up being unnecessary. He said he could have designed URLs without them, but didn’t realise at the time.