Orion

Constellation

Beliefs

The distinctive pattern of Orion has been recognized in numerous cultures around the world, and many myths have been associated with it. It has also been used as a symbol in the modern world.

Greek Mythology (Main Belief)

Orion's current name derives from Greek Mythology, in which Orion was a gigantic, supernaturally strong hunter of primordial times, born to Euryale, a nymph, and Neptune, god of the sea in the Greco-Roman tradition. One myth recounts Gaia's rage at Orion, who dared to say that he would kill every animal on the planet. The angry goddess tried to dispatch Orion with a Scorpion, the reason that the constellations of Scorpius and Orion are never in the sky at the same time. However,Ophichus, the Serpent Bearer, revived Orion with an antidote, the reason that the constellation of Ophiuchus stands midway between the Scorpion and the Hunter in the sky

Orion

The warrior

Orions Features

Orion's seven brightest stars form a distinctive hourglass-shapedasterism, or pattern, in the night sky. Four stars—Rigel, Betelgeuse, Bellatrix and Saiph form a large roughly rectangular shape, in the centre of which lie the three stars of Orions belt Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka. Descending from the 'belt' is a smaller line of three stars (the middle of which is in fact not a star but the Orion Nebula), known as the hunter's 'sword'.

Stars

Betelegeus

Rigel

Bellatrix

Mintaka

Alnilam

Alnitak

Saiph