@ the library

1.13.2016

Library Poster Printer is Open for Business!

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Thanks to Brad Thompson, the new library poster printer is up and running! Poster prints are 24" wide and can be printed to your required length. We will be charging $1.50 per linear foot printed in order to pay for materials costs. If you need something printed, just email me the file and let me know the dimensions you need. Keep in mind that the file you send me will need to high high resolution in order to avoid a blurry print!
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The New York Public Library has made available over 670,000 items digitized from the collection. New prints, manuscripts, maps, videos, and photographs are added daily, and over 180,000 are public domain images, which means they're free to reuse and modify. You and your students can browse the database by collection or do a keyword search to find exactly the results you need. The NYPL also has several programs designed to allow users to engage with the collection. Their Stereogranimator program lets users create 3D images and animated GIFs from the collection. The Map Warper program allows users to browse the map collection and layer historic maps over geography from today. The NYPL Digital Collections has something for everyone and is a great resource for you and your students!

It's Wednesday Treat Day!

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Today's treats are brought to you by Jimmy Calabro, Kathy Schronce, and Mark Pugh. Come on down to the library for fresh bagels, breakfast casserole, and danish! We're still looking for some people to sign up for Wednesday treats this semester, so please take a look at our sign up sheet while you're down here!

NEW BOOKS, AVAILABLE NOW!

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In a world dominated by people and rapid climate change, species large and small are increasingly vulnerable to extinction. In Resurrection Science , journalist M. R. O'Connor explores the extreme measures scientists are taking to try and save them, from captive breeding and genetic management to de-extinction. Paradoxically, the more we intervene to save species, the less wild they often become. In stories of sixteenth-century galleon excavations, panther-tracking in Florida swamps, ancient African rainforests, Neanderthal tool-making, and cryogenic DNA banks, O'Connor investigates the philosophical questions of an age in which we "play god" with earth's biodiversity. Each chapter in this beautifully written book focuses on a unique species--from the charismatic northern white rhinoceros to the infamous passenger pigeon--and the people entwined in the animals' fates. Incorporating natural history and evolutionary biology with conversations with eminent ethicists, O'Connor's narrative goes to the heart of the human enterprise: What should we preserve of wilderness as we hurtle toward a future in which technology is present in nearly every aspect of our lives? How can we co-exist with species when our existence and their survival appear to be pitted against one another?
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From admired historian--and coiner of one of feminism's most popular slogans--Laurel Thatcher Ulrich comes an exploration of what it means for women to make history. In 1976, in an obscure scholarly article, Ulrich wrote, "Well behaved women seldom make history."nbsp; Today these words appear on t-shirts, mugs, bumper stickers, greeting cards, and all sorts of Web sites and blogs. Ulrich explains how that happened and what it means by looking back at women of the past who challenged the way history was written. She ranges from the fifteenth-century writer Christine de Pizan, who wrote The Book of the City of Ladies, to the twentieth century's Virginia Woolf, author of A Room of One's Own. Ulrich updates their attempts to reimagine female possibilities and looks at the women who didn't try to make history but did. And she concludes by showing how the 1970s activists who created "second-wave feminism" also created a renaissance in the study of history.
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We live in an era of misinformation, much of it spread by authority figures, including politicians, religious leaders, broadcasters, and, of course, apps and websites. With so much bogus information coming from so many sources, how can anyone be expected to discover the truth? In Debunk It , author John Grant uses modern, ripped-from-the-headlines examples to clearly explain how to identify bad evidence and poor arguments. He provides a roundup of the rhetorical tricks people use when attempting to pull the wool over our eyes, and even offers advice about how to take these unscrupulous pundits down. So if you're tired of hearing blowhards spouting off about climate change, history, evolution, medicine, and more, this is the book for you. Debunk It is the ultimate guide for young readers seeking a firmer footing in a world that's full of holes.

Thanks for reading! - Jessica Hinman