"THE CURIOUS INCIDENT..."

BY MARK HADDON

what is it about?

This book was written by Mark Haddon and was published in 2003.
It's an english mystery novel where a teenager with an Asperger's Syndrome try to resolve a dog murder in his neighborhood.

This writer won several awards with this novel: "the Whitbread Book of the Year Award", " the Commonwealth Writers Prize", and the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize.

who is Mark Haddon?

Mark Haddon is an English novelist and poet who was born on 26 September 1962 in Northampton.
He studied English in Merton College (Oxford) and started to write when he was 25 years old.
After college, he was employed in several different occupations. One included working with people with disabilities, and another included creating illustrations and cartoons for magazines and newspapers.
He has written children's books and adult's books.

In 1987, Haddon wrote his first children’s book, Gilbert’s Gobstopper. This was followed by many other children’s books, which were often self-illustrated.

Haddon is also known for his series of Agent Z books. He also wrote the screenplay for the BBC television adaptation of Raymond Brigg's story Fungus the Bogeyman and wrote the BBC television drama Coming Down the Mountain.

In 2003, Haddon wrote the successful novel "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" that won many awards.

His second adult novel, A Spot of Bother, was published in September 2006.



SUMMARY OF THE BOOK

Christopher, a teenager with an autistic spectrum condiction who lives only with his father because his mother died , discovers the dead body of the neighbor's dog when he was taking an evening walk. After that, decides to find who killed the dog but,
his findings uncover important family secrets.


THE MAIN CHARACTERS

THE MAIN IDEA

This novel make us discover the austistic person life and its family; Its complications and its rewards, and finally you can learn how important is not lie and be honest in your life, with your family and friends, even that people be people with disabilities, because at the end, you can hurt them greater than if you don't tell them the truth.


WHO CAN ENJOY WITH THIS BOOK?

People who likes mystery novels will enjoy a lot with this book. You'll just spend a few days to read it because there're some interesting stories inside the full story.


MY IMPRESSION

I thought it was to be a child's book because it was written as a teenager with autism and actually it has been a surprise, because the story is so interesting and the personality of the main character too. This book can be read for children and for adults and it's a succefull book for both kind of readers. So I think that this is the best quality of this book because to get this it's very dificult.


I recommend to everyone to read this book. It’s well worth reading. You won't regreat!

INTERESTING VOCABULARY


Daydream: a series of pleasant thoughts that distract one's attention from the present

Rustle: make a soft , muffled crackling sound like that caused by the movement of dry leaves or paper.

Poodel: A dog of a breed with a curly coat that is usually clipped. The numerous varieties of poodle include standard, miniature, and toy.

underneath: situated directly below (something else).

Fur: The skin of an animal with such hair on it.

Mood: A temporary state of mind or feeling.

Faithful: Loyal, constant, and steadfast.

(to)Hug: hold (something) closely or tightly around or against part of one's body.

Forehead: the part of the face above the eyebrows.

Veined: marked with or as if with veins.

Rag: a piece of old cloth, especially one torn from a larger piece, used typically for cleaning things.

Tweezers: a small instrument like a pair of pincers for plucking out hairs and picking up small objects.

Glancing: striking someone or something at an angle rather than directly and with full force.

Snooker: a game played with cues on a billiard table in which the players use a cue ball (white) to pocket the other balls (fifteen red and six colored) in a set order.

Smash: violently break (something) into pieces.

(to)Groan: Make a deep inarticulate sound in response to pain or despair.


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The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time Interview