Fibonacci

Cameron Cook

Summary

Fibonacci or Leonardo Bigollo, was born in Pisa, Italy in 1170. His father worked as an administrator at Pisa's trading center in Algeria. When Fibonacci accompanied his father he often spent time in Bougie, where he was believed to have been taught the art of calculations using Hindu-Arabic numerals. Once Fibonacci got older he traveled to Egypt, Greece, Syria, and Sicily, he return to Pisa in 1200.


In 1202, Fibonacci published Liber abaci, or "Book of the Calculator". In the book he went into detail of the superiority of the Hindu-Arabic system. The book has four sections, section one describing Roman numerals and finger computation, the use of Hindu-Arabic numerals, the value of positional notation, and the use of the bar symbol for fractions. Sections 2 and 3 includes problems and solutions for algebra and the Fibonacci sequence (1,1,2,3,5,8,13...). The Fibonacci sequence is when each term occurring after the first two are calculated by adding the two terms before it. This sequence is used to explain pine cone scales and leaves and the spirals at the center of a daisie. To this day there is a society in the United States that the properties of sequences of numbers.


After 1225 not much is known about Fibonacci. In 1225 he won a math tournament at the court of Pisa. Fibonacci is believed to have spent the rest of his life in Pisa. He died in 1230. In the next two centuries after his death Liber Abaci was used to spread the Hindu-Arabic numeral system.

The world during 1170-1230

During the 12th century, the Normans are still attempting conquer. They are led by Roger I and Roger II, from Sicily. Roger I assumed the position of the First King of Sicily. Although this position was never approved by anyone, even the Pope. After many battles the Normans were the new rulers of Southern Italy. Many cities that were part of the Holy Roman Empire were attempting to become independent. Funded by the Byzantine Empire the were successful, but not until the 19th century.


In the 13th century Europe's' economy was increasing. Trade routes were create on land and water to connect the Mediterranean ports in Italy to the Hanseatic League of ports in Germany. City-states in Italy were growing in power. Eventually becoming independent. Naples was the only one that did not declare independence. New methods of commerce and infrastructure were being developed in parts with things like banks and exchange markets.


What effected Fibonacci the most was his knowledge on the Hindu-Arabic system. Once he discovered it he was amazed at what the system could do. He shared his knowledge through his book.


Other mathematicians who were alive while Fibonacci was are Gerland and Alhazen. Gerland primarily worked on problems related to the abacus and his work is currently held in the National Library of France in Paris. Alhazen whose work stood out more and physics. He was basically the Isaac Newton of his time.

Contibutions

Because of Fibonacci we can...

We don't have to use crazy symbols for numbers.

You think using letters in math is hard. Without the work of Fibonacci and many others we would not be able to do problems as simply as we can now.


We see the Fibonacci sequence in real life. Like when analyzing a hurricanes structure and measuring the length of arms in relation to the torso.


We can also use his sequence and apply it to word problems. Such as "How many pairs of mice that are placed in a enclosed space will be produced in a year from one pair of mice if

each pair gives birth to a new pair each month, beginning with the second month.

Work Cited


"Contents of This Page." Who Was Fibonacci? N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2016. <http://www.maths.surrey.ac.uk/hosted-sites/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibBio.html>.

"A Few Ways Fibonacci Can Be Helpful - All Star Charts -." All Star Charts. N.p., 05 Sept. 2013. Web. 04 Jan. 2016. <http://allstarcharts.com/fibonacci/>.

"Fibonacci Sequence." Fibonacci Sequence. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2016. <https://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/fibonacci-sequence.html>.

"Gerland (mathematician)." Gerland (mathematician). N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Jan. 2016. <http://www.gutenberg.us/articles/gerland_(mathematician)>.

"Leonardo Fibonacci." World of Scientific Discovery. N.p.: Gale, 2006. N.

pag. Student Resources in Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2015.