Clauses

Independent, Dependent, and Connecting

Dependent Clauses

A dependent clause is not a sentence. It is group of words that uses both a subject and a verb, but does not convey a full thought.


Examples

Right

When a person ran through the garden…

The frog jumped across...

The dog ran through...

Green grass grew in a shape…

The volcano exploded over...


Wrong

When a person ran through the garden, he smiled at everyone he saw.

Green is pretty.

The frog jumped across a river to the other bank.

Sky blue is blue.

The volcano exploded over the city underneath it with no warning.


Quiz Questions


  1. Which is a Dependent Clause?

    1. The man waved.

    2. The man waved at his friends as he walked down the street.

  2. Is “The cat ran” a dependent clause or an independent clause?

    1. Independent

    2. Dependent

  3. What two things are necessary for a dependent clause?

    1. Adjective and Noun

    2. Verb and Adjective

    3. Noun and Verb

Independent Clauses

A group of words which has a subject and verb and is a complete thought. An independent clause is a full sentence


What is an independent clause? (Answers of all questions at the bottom)


A. A sentence that can stand alone

B. A part of a sentence that can’t stand alone

C. Connecting words

D. A word added at the beginning of the sentence


Right Examples of Independent Clauses-

Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his chemistry quiz.

Kara ran around the track.

Kimmy exercised all day long.

Minnie baked for her friends and family.

Abbie ate a midnight snack.


Which of these examples would be an independent clause?


A. Julie had fun playing with her pets, because.

B. Cale played video games all day.

C. When I was having fun.

D. As the night was settling down.


Wrong Examples of Independent Clauses-

When I was swimming

As the lights were dimming

Because I can’t wait

Until the sun sets

When you go hiking


Read this sentence,

“Hillary went to the store to buy ingredients for dinner.”

What type of sentence is this?


A. Dependent

B. Complex

C. Independent

D. Dialogue

Coordinating Conjunctions

  1. Coordinating Conjunctions

  • A coordinating conjunction is a word used to connect two clauses.

  • The Seven Coordinating Conjunctions are...

    • and, but, for, or, nor, so, and yet

1. Which one of these is not a coordinating conjunction?

  1. Yet

  2. Why

  3. Nor

  4. So

  • A comma is used in front of the coordinating conjunction when it is used to connect two independent clauses

  • Right Examples

    • Ali tried to kill a person, but he couldn’t because it was Marcus.

    • Pablo tried to fail a test, yet he couldn’t because he is Pablo.

    • Aadith wanted to either fail his math homework, or fail his history test.

    • Sara likes fashion, One Direction, and scolding Aadith.

    • Mr. Bland wanted to make his students teach themselves, so he did.

2. Which one of these examples correctly uses a coordinating conjunction?

  1. Sally wanted to cross the street but she got hit by a car.

  2. Sally needed to annoy Joe, and get more fertilizer

  3. Joe had had a problem with Sally, so he killed her.

  4. Joe had the intent of killing, Sally but when he got there she was already dead.

  • Wrong Examples

    • Ali tried to kill a person but he couldn’t because it was Marcus.

    • Pablo tried to fail a test yet, he couldn’t because he is Pablo.

    • Aadith wanted to twerk, nor he did.

    • Sara likes fashion, One Direction, and, scolding Aadith

    • Mr. Bland wanted to make his students teach themselves,, so he did.


3. What is an example of incorrectly using a coordinating conjunction?

1. This is a sentence, but it is pointless.

2. Sentences are pointless, and this is no exception

3. Sentence and, but sentence.

4. I hate sentences, and so should you.

Independent Marker Words

  • A connecting word that is used at the beginning of an independent clause. These words can always begin a sentence that can stand alone.

    • Itbaan tried to go to the choir room. It was impossible because of all the shoes that Ms. Allen was throwing.

  • When you connect the second independent clause and you use an independent marker word, a semicolon must be used right before the IMW.

  • Some very common IMWs are:

    • also, consequently, furthermore, however, moreover, nevertheless, and therefore

  • Right Examples:

    • Aadith tried to play in the sunshine; however, an ant bit him and ran back inside.

    • Zanir frolicked in the grass; consequently, he got kidnapped by a man in a big white van.

    • Connor decided to punch the wall; therefore, he broke his hand.

    • Katniss tried to shoot Itbaan in the face; however, he drop kicked her.

    • Ali tried to throw a pencil at Mr. Bland; consequently, Mr. Bland threw a thousand markers at Ali.

  • Wrong Examples:

    • Aadith tried to play in the sunshine, however, an ant bit him and ran back inside

    • Zanir frolicked in the grass; consequently he got kidnapped by a man in a big white van

    • Connor decided to punch the wall therefore he broke his hand

    • Katniss tried to shoot Itbaan in the face however he drop kicked her.

    • Ali tried to throw a pencil at Mr. Bland; consequently Mr. Bland threw a thousand markers at Ali

  1. Name 3 Independent Marker Words

  2. What must be put before an Independent Marker Word to make it “grammatically” correct?

  1. comma

  2. apostraphe

  3. semicolon

  4. question mark

  1. A IMW connects 2 _____ and both of them can stand alone as a sentence without a IMV

  1. clauses

  2. nouns

  3. verbs

  4. adjectives

Answers to all the questions

Dependent-

1. A

2. B

3. C


Independent-

1.

2.

3.


Coordinating conjunctions-

1. 2

2. 3

3. 3


Independent marker words-

1. also, consequently, furthermore, however, moreover, nevertheless, and therefore

2. C

3. A