JM's Electromagnetic Waves Board

By Jonmichael Elliott

What kind of disturbance causes an electromagnetic wave?

The disturbance that causes an electromagnetic wave is called the oscillations of electric and magnetic fields.

Ways that Electromagnetic Waves are different than Mechanical Waves

  • Electromagnetic Waves don't need a medium to travel whilst Mechanical Waves do
  • Electromagnetic Waves can come in range of all frequencies, and Mechanical waves can only do this with a few certain frequencies
  • Electromagnetic Waves can travel through materials and Mechanical waves cannot
  • Electromagnetic Waves cannot transport energy and Mechanical waves can

Radio

Radio is one of the most commonly used every day items that uses Electromagnetic Waves. Radios capture radio waves sent out by radio stations. Also, airplanes use radio to communicate with airports and other airplanes. These types of Electromagnetic Waves use the lowest energy and have the lowest frequency, but have the highest wavelength on the Electromagnetic Wave spectrum.
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Microwave Radiation

Microwave Radiation is the next type of wave on the Electromagnetic Wave spectrum. Microwave Radiation is one way used through a Microwave oven, which transfers light energy into thermal energy; usually for cooking food. Microwave Radiation is also used by astronomers to learn about different structures of different galaxies. Microwaves use a little higher energy and have a little faster frequency, but have a little shorter wavelength than Radio waves.
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Infrared EM Waves

The next item on the Electromagnetic Wave spectrum is Infrared waves. One example of an item that uses Infrared waves is night vision goggles. Night vision goggles actually pick up Infrared EM waves, which allows the viewer to see humans skin or heat easily in the dark. Another example that uses Infrared rays every day is a TV remote. Infrared waves use a little higher energy and a little faster frequency than Microwave waves, but have a little shorter wavelength than Microwave waves.
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Visible Light

These waves are the next type of EM waves on the EM wave spectrum. For example, we can see different colors and light because of Visible Light. Another example is putting a prism to light and finding the Visible light spectrum at the other end. These waves use a little higher energy and a little faster frequency than Infrared waves, but have a little shorter wavelength than Infrared waves. These are the only Electromagnetic waves that are visible by the naked eye.
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Ultra-Violet Light

The next type of EM wave on the spectrum is EM Waves in the form of UV light. UV light is produced by the sun and causes our skin to burn and tan. Another example of UV light are the Aurora Polaris (Northern and Southern Lights). These waves use a little higher energy and a little faster frequency than Visible light waves, but have a little shorter wavelength than Visible light waves.
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X-Ray

X-Rays are the next type of EM wave on the EM wave spectrum. One way that X-Rays are used, is to search baggage in airports through security. Another common way that X-Rays are used, is in medical care when someone has a broken bone and the doctor needs to see it, or if a dentist needs to take pictures of their patient's teeth. These waves use a little higher energy and a little faster frequency than UV waves, but have a little shorter wavelength than UV light.
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Gamma-Ray

Gamma-Rays are the final type of EM wave on the EM wave spectrum. One way that Gamma-Rays are used is for doctors when they need to look inside a patient's brain or body. Another example is that Gamma-Rays can be used to kill cancer cells, also known as chemotherapy. These waves use the most energy and the fastest frequency on the spectrum, and have the shortest wavelength on the spectrum.
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Works Cited

Works Cited

"Discovery Education." Discovery Education. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2016. <https://app.discoveryeducation.com/learn/videos/E360CB2E-BBD7-4BB2-9E54-1075C91E9C82?hasLocalHost=false>.

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"National Aeronautics and Space Administration." Electromagnetic Spectrum. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2016. <http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/science/toolbox/emspectrum1.html>.

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"Uv+light+waves - Google Search." Uv+light+waves - Google Search. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2016. <https://www.google.com/search?q=uv%2Blight%2Bwaves&safe=active&rlz=1CADEAA_enUS667US667&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=657&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYqe-Iqf_LAhWOth4KHZp5AuAQ_AUIBigB#imgrc=yvXDppFZpk0_RM%3A>.

"Visible Light Waves." Visible Light Waves. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2016. <http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/visible.html>.

"Visible+light+waves - Google Search." Visible+light+waves - Google Search. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2016. <https://www.google.com/search?q=visible%2Blight%2Bwaves&safe=active&rlz=1CADEAA_enUS667US667&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=657&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiJ-N_wqP_LAhWEHR4KHYzdBAsQ_AUIBigB#imgrc=vEmv2NCH9EE2VM%3A>.

"What Causes the Disturbances in Fields That Produce Electromagnetic Waves?" - Physics Stack Exchange. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Apr. 2016. <http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/167017/what-causes-the-disturbances-in-fields-that-produce-electromagnetic-waves>.

"X-ray - Google Search." X-ray - Google Search. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2016. <https://www.google.com/search?q=x-ray&safe=active&rlz=1CADEAA_enUS667US667&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=765&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiDzt21yP_LAhWI7B4KHfFODe0Q_AUIBigB#imgrc=DogEFsNlaRmh4M%3A>.