PARENT UP-Date

Vol2.3 Setpember 2015

Parental Authority: A Privilege and Responsibility

As parents, the authority we use in the lives of our kids should be rooted in respect and hope. Our authority can lead our kids to their best life possible.


In this edition of the Parent UP-Date, we will explore the relationship between healthy parental authority and a healthy child. You can read an informative article about parenting with proper authority, take a survey to offer your insight, and find your way back to the abundance of resources at Parentupkc.org that exist to help you in your important, and sometimes overwhelming, job as parent.


We hope you find the information helpful to you right now. If you think of someone else who needs encouragement or information, please pass this update along.


Here's to hoping you get to hear from your kids someday how much they appreciate your hard work as their parent. If they don't say it, hear it from us: We appreciate all you do to keep our kids safe, healthy, and strong.


-The Parent Up Team

Parenting Styles and Teen Drinking Tendencies

A recent, comprehensive and inclusive survey of adolescents by pediatric doctors and psychiatrists, found parenting styles to have and impact on teen drinking.


Two major characteristics were observed in defining different parenting styles:

  • control (how much intervention a parent has in their adolescent's life) and

  • warmth (how much positive affect a parent shows towards their child- Warmth is feelings and evidence of love)


The four parenting styles identified in the article were:

1). Authoritative (high warmth, appropriate control)

2). Neglectful (no warmth, no control)

3). Authoritarian (no warmth, high control)

4). Permissive (high warmth, no control)


The study concludes, the authoritative parenting style is optimal.


Authoritative parenting offers a kid the long-term benefits of "academic success, positive peer relationships, minimal delinquent behavior, risk avoidance, and positive psycho-social adjustment."


Parents are endowed with a responsibility to care deeply about their children, know and invest in them as individuals, stay present, and implement authority and accountability when necessary for the health and betterment of their child.


Think about what appropriate control should look like in your house. For what issues do you need to use your authority as parent? When does your child get all power to choose on their own?


How can you show warmth towards your child even as you exert necessary control? Perhaps punishment conversations happen outside of the immediate misbehavior when you can lovingly and non-condescendingly tell your kids they have consequences?


Recognize that authority might invite rebellion or backlash, making you uncomfortable or your child unhappy. However, conflict and struggle do not mean the plan is wrong. Instead, fight for what your kid needs, know you have the authority to inspire them to health and wholeness, and be on their team in the battle.

Please Weigh In: A Survey for Missouri Parents of 6th-12th graders

Help Keep Kids Safe This School Year

We're collaborating with ACT Missouri (our statewide prevention agency) to help gather information from parents of 6th-12th graders. Please give your insight about substance use and other important issues affecting teens in your community by participating in this survey:

http://surveys.missouri.edu/parents

It is confidential and anonymous. Your answers will help prevention programming efforts in Missouri.

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Refresh or Read Anew: Resources Galore at ParentupKC.org

PARENTUPKC.com has many resources to help you navigate towards warm control in your parental authority. Check out this information and take action with your kids right now.


Don't Miss:


  • Our Talk Tip Series- whether you have a 6 year old or a 16 year old, we can help you have conversations about alcohol.
  • Download our No Use Contracts. You can't (and don't want to be!) everywhere with your child or teen. Use these contracts to communicate your expectations. Talking though these rules with your child will help guide them to make good decisions and choose the right thing even if you're not around.
  • Learn the facts about the dangers and realities of minors consuming alcohol
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