E-Day: The Truth

The real story of Japanese-American internment

John Papas Dennerline

Big image

"Japanese-Americans voluntarily register for evacuation..."

Taken from Life in a Japanese American Internment Camp

What the People Thought vs. Reality

When the USA decided to evacuate the roughly 100,000 Japanese-Americans on the west coast, the government tried to hide it as best they could. At first the Japanese were labeled as enemies, but once evacuations started, the government attempted to put as positive a spin on things as best they could. The above photo shows Japanese-Americans 'voluntarily and willingly' registering for evacuation. Below is a small truck full of Japanese-Americans used to transport them to assembly centers. The picture is reminiscent of Holocaust photos of the Germans at this time. The government got all Americans to think that this was all okay, because of cleverly taken photos and slyly written captions. In the photos above, especially the large one, the people are depicted as normal, respectable, US citizens. They (and all Americans were under the impression that they were just going to be relocated to a different home for some time, with good conditions. In reality, these 'homes' and 'relocation centers' were more prison-like, with cattle-car - type transportation and armed guards at the camp perimeter. And that's not all: the Japanese-Americans were still labeled as enemies.
Big image
Taken from Life in a Japanese American Internment Camp
Big image