The American West

By: Ariana Tormes

What is Manifest Destiny and its role in Westward Expansion?

Manifest Destiny is the 19th-century doctrine or belief that the expansion of the US throughout the American continents was both justified and inevitable. The purchase of the Louisiana Territory from France, The Lewis and Clark expedition, President Thomas Jefferson's vision of expanding into the available land to create an empire of liberty and a growing sense of American manifest destiny.

2 Historical Examples

  • The corps of discovery expedition of Lewis and Clark gave the American government and people a glimpse of the land to the west
  • Jefferson's concept of an empire of liberty for enterprising, independent people was carried on by succeeding presidents.

INDIAN WARS

Overview

The indian wars is the series of conflicts in the western United States between Native Americans, American settlers, and the United States Army starting in 1622. Because there were series of conflicts in the western United States between Native Americans and the American settlers. The major affect is that the wars resulted in the destruction of the indians' way of life and the opening of the West for American West for American use.

Key Terminology (five important places)

  1. Virginia - a twelve year conflict left many natives and colonists dead.
  2. Massachusetts - where the King Phillips war took place
  3. Arizona - rebelled against the Spanish and lived independently for 12 years
  4. Ohio River Valley - a large alliance drove out the British at every post except Detroit
  5. Tennessee - Where the Cherokee chief and the and his followers who did not like the peace separated from the tribe and relocated to.

Tools of the Trade

  1. Horses
  2. Guns
  3. Club Heads
  4. Spears
  5. Tipis

Primary Documents

Mining in the West

Overview

The mining in the west was where miners were drawn to the west in 1859 because they found gold and silver in western Nevada. One of its major effects were that it produced over $500 million worth of gold and silver over the next 20 years.

Key Terminology

  1. Henry Comstock - a man whose name was used for the Comstock Lode which was a Nevada gold and silver mine discovered in 1859.
  2. Mark Twain - wrote an autobiographical work called "Roughing It" that went along with what was happening in the Boom Years
  3. Boomtowns - were produced by mining booms, and these towns were communities that sprang up when a mine opened.
  4. Comstock Lode - gold and silver in western Nevada.
  5. Ghost Town - created by news of gold big increase in population.

Tools of the Trade

  1. Railroads
  2. Pony Express
  3. Gold
  4. Silver
  5. Mines

Primary Documents

Settlers and Farmers on the Plains

Overview

In 1862 the Homestead Act was passed. The government helped people to settle on the Great Plains. The government sold people over 100 acres of land for a small fee. If they could farm the land for five years they could own it. Winters very cold but the summer was hot and dry. There were many droughts. Grass fires would start because it was so dry.

Key Terminology (five important dates)

  1. 1862 Homestead Act - each family given 160 acres as long as they farmed for 5 years.
  2. 1873 Timber Culture Act - another 160 acres as long as 40 were planted with trees.
  3. 1877 Desert Land Act - 640 acres of cheap land available in areas with low rainfall.
  4. Civil War ended in 1865 and people went west
  5. 1862 through 1900 about 80 million acres of public land on the Great Plains were settled

Tools of the Trade

  1. Sod Houses
  2. Steel Plows
  3. Water Pumping Windmills
  4. Barbed Wire
  5. Mechanical Reaper

Primary Documents

The Era of the Cowboy

Overview

The Era of the Cowboy lasted 20 years (1866-1886). It originally started in Texas, after the Civil War there were estimated 5 million of them. Caused by high costs they moved to Sedalia. They searched for routes with better grass and fewer Indians and farmers.

Key Terminology (five important places)

  1. Colorado
  2. Idaho
  3. Washington
  4. Utah
  5. Nevada

all cattle enterprises

Tools of the Trade

  1. Cattle
  2. Crops
  3. Floppy Rimed hats
  4. Barbed Wire
  5. Railroad

Primary Documents

Outlaws, Gunfighters, and Lawmen

Overview

Outlaws, Gunfighters and Lawmen were legendary people in the West. American Outlaws and Lawmen, the confusing this is that they were interchangeable and a lawman could have been a bandit in a different state.

Key Terminology (five important people)

  1. Jesse James - a confederate soldier that was under Bloody Bill Anderson’s leadership.
  2. Frank James- the brother to Jesse James and also ran the west robbing banks with the gang.
  3. Billy the Kid - one of the iconic figures of the west and known for robbing banks as well as other establishments with money.
  4. Butch Cassidy - Butch Cassidy was a famous bank robber of the late 1800.
  5. Dalton Gang - a gang of brothers that started out as lawmen the late 1800s that turned to become outlaws after have a few payments missed for work they had done.

Tools of the Trade

  1. Guns
  2. Money
  3. Places to Rob
  4. Fast Horse
  5. Escape Route

Primary Documents

Mountain Men, Hunters, and Trappers

Overview

Mountain Men, Hunters, and Trappers lives were not ran by the clock, they were run by the seasons.. A mountain man is a male trapper and explorer who lives in the wilderness The spring hunt was usually the most profitable. Whatever they hunted was up for sale like furs.

Key Terminology (five important people)

  1. John Albert - 1834–1847
  2. William Henry Ashley - 1822–1828
  3. Jim Baker - 1839–1873
  4. James Beckwourth - 1824–1866
  5. Charles Bent - 1828–1846

active years

Tools of the Trade

  1. Boots
  2. Guns
  3. Knives
  4. Traps
  5. Axes

Primary Documents