The Longest Ride

By Nicholas Sparks

Point of View used in the book

First person is used in The Longest Ride. Ira tells parts of the book from his point of view and Ruth tells part of the story from her point of view. Also, Sophia tells some parts and Luke tells some parts. There are four points of view, but they are all written in first person.

Summary of the book

Ira Levinson gets into a car crash. He is stranded in a hidden snowbank down in a ditch off the highway. Suffering many injuries and struggling to remain consciousness Ira sees a blurry image of his wife Ruth who passed away 9 years ago. Ruth helps him stay alert by recounting stories of their 50 years together. Throughout the story, how they met, the painting collection gathered, and when Ira served in WWII and how it effected their family, was told. Ira knows Ruth isn't actually in the car but he holds on to her words and the memories.


A couple miles away at a rodeo, Sophia Danko meets a boy named Luke Collins. They exchange numbers and go on a first date, that date soon turned into a second date and so on. Sophia and Luke learn many things together. As the two fall in love, Sophia finds that her future that she had planned is different than the one she wants with Luke. But Luke could destroy her plan with his huge secret he has been keeping.


These two couples with barely anything in common find that their lives will soon converge when Sophia and Luke find Ira. They take him to the hospital where he shares some of his stories with the young couple.

The Longest Ride TV SPOT - Love Requires Sacrifice (2015) - Britt Robertson, Scott Eastwood Movie HD

Characters in the Story

Literary Devices

Imagery: (Pg 75) (Ira) When summer drew to a close and Ruth boarded the train for Massachusetts, I retreated to a corner of the station, my face in my hands,....

Simile: (pg 194) (Ira and Ruth) It was like finding a treasure chest in the unlikeliest of places.

Foreshadowing: (Page 194) (Ira and Ruth) But you did not understand that yet.

Story Critique

The story did a good job explaining lots of the details. We would recommend this book for kids over the age of 12. The story uses advanced words that younger children may not understand. The book is very long, but once you finish it, you will realize it was worth it. We both think this is a great book and it is one of our favorites.
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