"Warming Up" to Feedback

Without feedback, progress is very unlikely.

"Embracing an Opportunity to Learn"

Check out this blog entitled "Why I Asked My Principal to Observe My Craziest Class."

The Pineapple Chart is a great way to open the door to feedback!

Receiving the input of others can be somewhat intimidating. This is true for students as well as teachers. Creating a safe culture to illicit appropriate feedback in our school is exactly what will launch us forward into a growth mindset. "Opening the doors" of our classroom to our colleagues has often been looked upon as a negative thing. Thoughts such as "What am I doing wrong?" and "What are they really looking for?" appear across our radar screen. Perhaps our paradigm can be shifted to "What am I doing well?" and "How can I share this with others?" Great things are going on within each of your classrooms!


Continue to populate the Pineapple Chart with those great activities. It is easy for us to just assume "no one wants to see what I'm doing." Sharing your expertise helps everyone achieve more. Effective feedback gives us a wealth of information in which we can sharpen our instructional practices and, ultimately, move ALL of OUR students to the next level!




Within this Instructional Smore, you will find informative and inspirational videos, articles, and ideas that will encourage you to grow in your gifts and help grow the gifts of others.

Special thanks to Tina, HJHS PTO, and Warehouse Coffee for their contribution towards our Pineapple Perks!

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Using Student Surveys

Students can be our biggest fans or best critics. Give them a different statements to rate on a scale. Statement could include "I felt challenged by this class," "I felt like you had high expectations for me," "I felt like you gave me timely and useful feedback for my work. Including open-ended questions adds a in-depth look into what is really going on inside the mind of the student. Ask them "Which units of study have you enjoyed the most," What strategies helped you learn the material best?", and "What advice can you give for how I can make my class better?"


This is a great time to reflect on the praise, and or the comments that "get under your skin." It is also important to consider... What did you do to receive that praise? Is there any truth to the negative feedback that was stated?


The most important aspect of the student survey is to use their feedback to guide and/or modify your instructional plan for the next school year.

Open Invitation

As we explore the idea of effective feedback this month, please consider how we can partner together to sharp our instructional practices. Whether it is co-planning lessons, looking at student work, talking over new strategies, or you just need a little PLC(Professional Learning Community), please take a minute and give me some feedback on ways that I can support you in this journey.