Teenagers and Technology

How is technology affecting your child?

The multifaceted effect of technology on teens:

  • Smartphones are necessary for a society that never stops moving. You can do so much and affect so many people with such a small piece of metal. Want to check your email? Check your phone. Want to share your vacation pictures? Upload them from your phone. Want to show someone a picture of your new puppy? Grab your phone and instagram it. Want to bully that kid from your chemistry class? Use your phone. Want to comment means things on someone's selfie? Your phone. Want to tell that kid to kill himself? Phone.



  • Social media use has been demonstrated to have links with adolescent depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and personality disorders. However, studies also suggest that social media may be a useful vehicle for public health education and fostering creativity.


  • Face-to- face communication has become a rarity. People use emails, texts, messaging. And if they do happen to be physically present, they are not tuned into the conversation because they are too busy checking their phone. However, Technology is imperative for a successful long distance relationship with a friend or significant other.
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I Forgot My Phone
TEENS REACT TO SMARTPHONES

1 out of 13 people in the world have a facebook account. 1 out of 9 people in the world have access to clean water.

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Put that Phone Down!

The maximum amount of screen time allotted for teens is around 2 hours per day. Help your child stick to this goal by:

  • Exercising with them instead of watching TV
  • Having a family dinner in the dining room
  • Talking to your kids about moderation
  • Lead by example!
  • And if all else fails...

Android has recently released an app called Breakfree and its purpose is to help you stop using your phone. The app sends you a notification when you are spending too much time on your phone and it gives you a score that you have to beat.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=mrigapps.andriod.breakfree.deux&hl=en

Cyber-Bullying

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Do you believe your child is being cyber bullied?


Bullying is usually done by children who are of high status or are liked for their athletic skills and leadership qualities. There are also the bullies that are disliked and excluded from their peer groups, therefore, they became aggressive. Unfortunately, the internet has allowed bullying to become a wider spread phenomenon. Cyber bullying is much more appealing to bullies because there is a sense of anonymity and they can continue to torment their victim, even when they're home.


This website provides parents with the tools and information to properly address the situation with your child:

http://www.internetsafety101.org/

It's Not all That Bad...

Positive effects of technology

  • Research- Gives students the ability to broaden their searches and increase their knowledge on various subjects.
  • Globalization- Allows students to learn about various cultures and helps them connect globally.
  • Web Seminars- Allows for students who wish to take courses with professors who are in a different part of the world to partake in lessons from long distance.
  • Distance Education- Permits students who are hospital bed-ridden to continue their education.
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Resources:

Articles:


Hur, J. L., & Gupta, M. (2013). Growing up in the web of social networking: Adolescent development and social media. Adolescent Psychiatry, 3(3), 233-244.


Ghose, T. (2013, October 28). Pediatricians: No More than 2 Hours Screen Time Daily for Kids. Retrieved November 18, 2014, from


Books:

Berk, L. (2007). Emotional and Social Development in Middle Childhood. In Development Through the Lifespan (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.


Pictures and charts:

Victims of Cyber-bullying

Available at:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2294023/Facebook-worst-social-network-bullying-New-survey-shows-youngsters-targeted-online-else.html



The Digital Life of American Teens

Available at:

http://www.statista.com/chart/1655/the-digital-life-of-american-teens/


Media Device Ownership in Teens age 12 to 17

Source: Madden, M., Lenhart, A., Duggan, M., Cortesi, S., & Gasser, U. (2013). Teens and Technology 2013. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.

Available at:

http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2013/PIP_TeensandTechnology2013.pdf