Albie Sachs

Smore by Emily Lawrence

Biography

Born in 1935, Albie Sachs was raised in South Africa by his parents Emil (Solly) Sachs and Ray Ginsberg, both members of the Communist Party who fought for equal rights among all races. Sachs carried this mentality of equality with him as he excelled through life as seen through his involvement with the Defiance of Unjust Laws Campaign and later through his defense of Africans on trial as a lawyer. After a series of jail sentences, Sachs left to continue his work safely in England where he began to teach at the University of Southampton as well as to inform Europeans more about his experiences with the apartheid in South Africa through his theses and memoirs. 11 years later Sachs returned to Africa (Mozambique) and began again to help racial equality to be achieved in South Africa from the outside by working with the likes of Oliver Tambo in creating the ANC's Code of Conduct. In 1988, Sachs lost his arm and vision in one eye due to an bomb planted in his car. It was an attempt by South Africans to take his life. Despite protests of pro apartheid members of government, 24 years after Albie Sachs left his place of birth, he returned to South Africa once again.


Upon his return, Sachs' began his biggest contribution in fighting the apartheid movement and reforming what came after. He joined the Constitutional Committee that had the immensely important job of creating a nondiscriminatory charter for the country to adopt in order to legally enforce the end of apartheid. Sachs specifically sought after a Bill of Rights to be included in the Constitution, similarly to America, ensuring that all citizens had stated rights specific to their freedom as well as their well being. When Mandela was elected president in 1994, the very Constitution that Sachs contributed to was adopted, including his Bill of Rights. Following this, Sachs joined 11 others on the Constitutional Court where he continued to fight injustice through the courtroom on issues including the death penalty, homosexuality, and AIDs prevention. He served until 2009. Albie Sachs worked tirelessly throughout his whole life to fight apartheid through the justice system despite physical, mental, and vocational sacrifices that this fight caused him to make. The charter that he contributed to outlined the new era of South Africa and fundamentally changed the way that society would exist in the future.

Rights

7.

(1) This Bill of Rights is a cornerstone of democracy in South Africa. It enshrines the rights of all people in our country and affirms the democratic values of human dignity, equality and freedom.

(2) The state must respect, protect, promote and fulfill the rights in the Bill of Rights.

(3) The rights in the Bill of Rights are subject to the limitations contained or referred to in section 36, or elsewhere in the Bill.

References

Works Cited

“Albie Sachs biography -- academy of achievement.” 4 Dec. 2013. 15 Nov. 2015. <http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/sac0bio-1#>.

“Bill of Rights PDF.” n.d. 16 Nov. 2015. <http://www.justice.gov.za/legislation/constitution/SAConstitution-web-eng-02.pdf>.

“Justice Albie Sachs.” Constitutional Court of South Africa. n.d. 15 Nov. 2015. <http://www.constitutionalcourt.org.za/site/judges/justicealbiesachs/index1.html>.

“South African freedom fighter addresses gay marriage at UF Law Tuesday.” FlaLawOnline. 25 Mar. 2015. 16 Nov. 2015. <http://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/albie-sachs.jpg>.

Citations, Quotes & Annotations

“Albie Sachs biography -- academy of achievement.” 4 Dec. 2013. 15 Nov. 2015. <http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/sac0bio-1#>.

(“Albie Sachs Biography -- Academy of Achievement”)

“Bill of Rights PDF.” n.d. 16 Nov. 2015. <http://www.justice.gov.za/legislation/constitution/SAConstitution-web-eng-02.pdf>.

(“Bill of Rights PDF”)

“Justice Albie Sachs.” Constitutional Court of South Africa. n.d. 15 Nov. 2015. <http://www.constitutionalcourt.org.za/site/judges/justicealbiesachs/index1.html>.

(“Justice Albie Sachs”)

“South African freedom fighter addresses gay marriage at UF Law Tuesday.” FlaLawOnline. 25 Mar. 2015. 16 Nov. 2015. <http://www.law.ufl.edu/flalaw/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/albie-sachs.jpg>.

(“South African Freedom Fighter Addresses Gay Marriage at UF Law Tuesday”)