Codeine

A Narcotic

What is Codeine?

Codeine is a narcotic and a pain medication. When used for medical purposes it dulls the senses, relieves pain and helps you fall asleep. When abused or taken in large amounts, it can become addictive, cause coma, near-unconsciousness and uncontrolled shaking.

How is Codeine Taken?

You can take codeine orally as a pill or in cough syrup. Those who abuse the drug will usually mix cough syrup with a soft drink and a Jolly Rancher for extra flavor or sweetness. It can also be injected into people 12 years old and over.

Street/Slang Names for Codeine

  • Purple Drank
  • Texas Tea
  • Sizzurp
  • Purple Jelly
  • Orange Crush
  • Sip-Sip
  • Lean
  • Syrup
  • Drank
  • Captain Cody
  • Schoolboy

How Does Codeine Affect the Body?

SHORT


  • euphoria
  • itching
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • pupil enlargement
  • urinary retention
  • depression
  • constipation
  • lack of sexual drive
  • erectile dysfunction


LONG

  • itching
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • high blood pressure
  • constipation
  • liver damage
  • stomach ulcers

Signs of Abuse

  • brain slows or even stops endorphin production
  • acute pain with out using the drug
  • Euphoria
  • calmness
  • depression
  • mood swings
  • anxiety
  • drowsiness
  • increased time sleeping
  • less of an appetite
  • no longer cares for others
  • going to the doctor often
  • stealing other's prescriptions
  • constipation
  • blue lips and fingernails
  • muscle twitches
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dry mouth
  • itching
  • rashes
  • urinary retention
  • hypotension
  • seizure
  • respiratory depression
  • decreased libido
  • hallucinations
  • delusions
  • memory loss
  • lack of emotion

Dependence/Addiction

People can become both physically and psychologically dependent on codeine. Those who are psychologically dependent are most likely using the drug to deal with an untreated mental disorder. Codeine treats the unpleasant side effects of the mental disorder. People who become physically dependent, their body develops a need for the drug. The body then produces less dopamine and similar chemicals. Tolerance levels rise quickly and the person requires higher dosages to have the same feeling.
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