optical,magnetic and solid state

storage

optical storage

Optical storage is a term from engineering referring to the Storage of data on an optically readable medium. Data is recorded by making marks in a pattern that can be read back with the aid of light, usually a beam of laser light precisely focused on a spinning disc. An older example, that does not require the use of computers, is microform. There are other means of optically storing data and new methods are in development. Optical storage differs from other data storage techniques that make use of other technologies such as magnetism or semiconductors.


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magnetic storage

Magnetic storage and magnetic recording are terms from engineering referring to the storage of data on a magnetized medium. Magnetic storage uses different patterns of magnetization in a magnetizable material to store data and is a form of non-volatile memory. The information is accessed using one or more read/write heads. As of 2013, magnetic storage media, primarily hard disks, are widely used to store computer data as well as audio and video signals. In the field of computing, the term magnetic storage is preferred and in the field of audio and video production, the term magnetic recording is more commonly used. The distinction is less technical and more a matter of preference. Other examples of magnetic storage media include floppy disks, magnetic recording tape, andmagnetic stripes on credit cards.


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solid state storage

A solid-state drive (SSD) (also known as a solid-state disk [1][2][3] or electronic disk,[4] though it contains no actual "disk" of any kind, nor motors to "drive" the disks) is a data storage device using integrated circuit assemblies as memory to store data persistently. SSD technology uses electronic interfaces compatible with traditional block input/output (I/O) hard disk drives, thus permitting simple replacement in common applications.[5] Also, new I/O interfaces like SATA Express are created to keep up with speed advancements in SSD technology.

SSDs have no moving mechanical components. This distinguishes them from traditional electromechanical magnetic disks such as hard disk drives (HDDs) or floppy disks, which contain spinning disks and movable read/write heads.[6] Compared with electromechanical disks, SSDs are typically more resistant to physical shock, run more quietly, have lower access time, and less latency.[7] However, while the price of SSDs has continued to decline in 2012,[8] SSDs are still about 7 to 8 times more expensive per unit of storage than HDDs.


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