Respiratory System

Brittany Ciezki

Respiratory System

The primary organs of the respiratory system are lungs, which function to take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide as we breathe. Red blood cells collect the oxygen from the lungs and carry it to the parts of the body where it is needed.
Big image

Lungs

The lungs are a large, spongy organ, it's lateral to the heart. The left lung is smaller than the right lung. Holds air until the rest of the parts get there jobs/functions done.
Big image

Trachea

5 in. tube, made of cartilage. The trachea is connected to the larynx and lets air pass into the lungs. The main function of the trachea is to provide a clear airway for air to enter and exit the lungs.
Big image

Bronchi

There are 2 parts, left and right main branches, which run into the lungs. There are a ton of little, different bronchi branches. The main function is to carry air from the trachea to the lung.
Big image

Diaphragm

The diaphragm is attached to the spine, ribs, and the sternum. This is the main muscle of respiration. The diaphragm is the upward arching sheet of muscle underneath the lungs. There are two parts, the peripheral ad the central aponeurotic. The peripheral is made up of muscle fibers that converge on the central aponeurotic. The central aponeurotic is also known as the central tendon, and it is a think, flat plate of dense fibers.
Big image

Intercostal Muscle

There are many small intercostal muscles between the ribs. There are two parts of the intercostal muscle, the internal and external. The internal muscles are deeper, and depress the ribs to compress the thoracic cavity to force air out when exhaled. The external muscles are superficial to the internal muscles, and the elevate the ribs; expand the thoracic cavity to let air to be inhaled.
Big image

Nasal Cavity, Naso, Oro, and Laryngopharynx

Nasal Cavity: The nose is the main external opening, made of cartilage, bone, muscle, and skin that supports the anterior portion of the Nasal Cavity. The main function is to warm, moisturize, and filter air entering the body before it reaches the lungs.

Nasopharynx: The upper part of the throat, and behind the nose. The nasopharynx remains open even when surrounding muscles flex, so you can keep breathing.

Oropharynx: Extends from the uvula (dangling thing in the back of the mouth) to the epiglottis. It is the main passageway for air, food, and drinks.

Laryngopharynx: Is where both food and air pass. Located between the hyoid bone, the larynx, and the esophagus. The main function is to help guide food and air where to go.

Big image

Larynx

The larynx is more commonly known as the voice box. The main function of the larynx is to vibrate the vocal folds to produce vocal sounds. The tension and the vibration speeds change the pitch of your voice.
Big image

Epiglottis

The epiglottis is essentially a trapdoor. It's located at the entrance of the larynx and the base of the tongue. Is shaped like a leaf and guards the glottis (the opening between the vocal cords.) When you swallow food the epiglottis flaps over the trachea so food or liquid can't get to the lungs.
Big image

Mouth

Also known as the Oral Cavity. Secondary external opening. The Nasal Cavity has the primary job of breathing, but the mouth takes over when needed. The only advantage is the shorter distance and larger diameter allows more air in quickly.
Big image

Article on EV-D68

This illness is called Enterovirus D68. It was first discovered in California, in 1962. Hundreds of children have been hospitalized by a respiratory illness that seemed like a cold. Some kids would tell parents that they didn't feel good: with body and muscle aches, and cold symptoms; then they passed out. Colorado, Missouri, Ohio, Georgia, Iowa, North Carolina, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Oklahoma all asked for CDC help because they didn't know what to do. This has been going on since mid August to now... The virus is spreading, it hasn't hit Wisconsin yet, but it's getting there.


http://www.newser.com/story/193538/hundreds-of-kids-get-cold-like-virus.html

http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html?