Shavuot

A Jewish Holiday

The Origin Of Shavuot

This celebrates the giving of the Torah, when the exodus of Egypt had happened, the people of Israel proceeded to mount Sinai, and Moses had ascended to the mountain to meet God, and he was given the ten commandments. They were written on stone tablets and they were to be delivered to the children of Israel. It took 49 days to get to mount Sinai. According to the Torah, “you shall proclaim that day (the 50th day) to be a holy convocation.” Shavuot is also a harvest holiday, marking the end of spring barley harvest and the beginning of summer wheat harvest. In the time of the temple in Jerusalem, the Israelites brought their first fruits to offer God at Shavuot.

Joshua The Messiah

Shavuot is the Hebrew word for weeks, referring to the marking of the Torah at Mount Sinai, which occurs seven weeks over Passover. Today, Shavuot is a celebration of the Torah, education, and actively willing to participate in Jewish life. Not all Jews celebrate this holiday though, only a small fraction. Most Jews believe that the Messiah has not come yet. But there is a small fraction that believes Joshua was their Messiah.

The Shavuot Celebration

Parents and children gather around and say, "thank God for his teachings and precepts." They study the ten commandments and they act out the book of Ruth. They only eat dairy food, and they sing songs about the holy spirit. They bake a cake for Joshua and give small children gifts.

Sources

"Shavuot History | ReformJudaism.org." Reform Judaism. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

"Shavuot." Shavuot. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

"Eating Dairy Foods." - Shavuot. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

"What Is Shavuot? - Re-accept the Torah." - Shavuot. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

Shavuot Activities for Kids." My Jewish Learning. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.