Miners, How They Survived

By: Tyler Mathews

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Conservation

For food they had twenty cans of tuna fish, one can of peaches, one can of salmon and a few crackers. That's all they had to eat, they had to have unreasonably small rations. Every twenty four hours they had a small piece of tuna. For them small meant half of a bottle cap in size. For drinks they had oily water that the machines used to cool themselves when in use and rotten milk.
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How they were saved

They were saved by as much as nine drills looking for them. Although only two of them were expected to get into the mine. They had a plan A and a plan B. Plan A was suppose to hit the mine first and if it failed then hopefully plan B will be able to save them. Turns out plan A was slower then expected and plan B ended up saving them.

Luis Urzua; their Unspoken Leader

Luis had persevered through all of his dangerous life threatening adversities. Without him, the miners might not of had equal rations. Another important thing that he did was keep all of the miners positive and hopeful without getting them too complacent and overwhelmed. With out him the miners might of died of starvation or they might have gotten out of control or gotten idle; he kept them busy by working in the mines and venturing into the mine. He might have done this too keep them busy and to keep the thought that they were stuck 2,000 feet in the mine with thousands of tons of rock blocking the exit.
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How it effected other mines

The rocks fell down on the only entrance trapping all 33 of the miners. Because of this they were all trapped causing they mining community to revisit their safety procedures and add more exit routes. In America you were required to have at least three escape routes in a mine in case of an emergency like this. In Chile they are required to have at least two, most mines in chile only have one, if any.
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