Ultrasound Cavitation principle

Ultrasound Cavitation principle

Ultrasound Cavitation principle

Cavitation is the action of ultrasounds through a liquid medium. Also called sound waves or pressure waves, an ultrasound is an acoustic wave with a frequency of between 15 and 10,000 kHz. Their behaviors are due to their interactions with the environment in which they are spread. Ultrasonic waves can spread in biological tissues. When a liquid is submitted to these pressure waves, bubbles form and increase in size until they implode when they reach a very high temperature and a very high pressure. The generated thermal energy during this phenomenon and the compressing and decompressing waves, are responsible for the implosion of the micro cavities. In order for the acoustic cavitation takes place, a minimum threshold of 0.5 W / cm ² to 20 kHz must be achieved.

Several factors influence the implosion of the bubbles:
- The decompression period of the bubble: If the ultrasound frequency is too high, the decompression will be too fast and the cavitational effect will not occur.
- The viscosity of the medium (internal resistance): the higher it is, the more inseparable the particles are. The cavitational phenomenon is therefore hard to obtain in this situation.
- Homogeneity of the medium: In a homogeneous medium, are not diffracted very much and travel in a straight line.

Only highly powerful ultrasounds can modify the environment within which they are spread.

2 activities

Cavitation can be used as part of a slimming program, in order to treat localized areas of excess fat and accumulated fat layers. Low frequency sound waves, formed using a transducer, create cavitational bubbles in the water that is present in our cells. When they implode these bubbles damage the adipose cell membranes which frees the triglycerides from these fat cells. Cavitation can also be used for physiotherapy by using mechanical and thermal effects to influence muscle pain, tendinitis and swelling.

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