Midway's Destruction Key for Japan

Japanese Attacks Midway

Summary of Event

The Japanese knew that Midway was important to them, after all it gave them control in the Pacific. Chūichi Nagumo launched his first strike, and it did a lot of damage to the U.S Ships at Midway. The United States struck over and over on Japanese ships but even though the U.S lost 65 of there own ships on strikes on the Japanese ships. Then 55 U.S dive bombers took advantage of the Chūichi Nagumo, confused their strategies, and the U.S sunk 3 to 4 Japanese carriers.

DETAILED EXPLANATION

The Battle of Midway started when the Japanese planned an attack on U.S ships to control the main waterways of the Pacific. Japanese commanders Isoroku Yamamoto, Nobutake Kondō, and Chūichi Nagumo wanted to expand their defensive lines in the Pacific and force the U.S to retreat back to their homeland.


The Japanese tried to estimate the date that the U.S was going to attack them and lure them into a trap. The plan started by false Japanese calculations saying that the U.S had technical difficulties trying to find out when the Japanese were going to attack, but American code breakers were able to find out when the Japanese were going to attack, setting up their own ambush. American Commanders Chester W. Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond Spruance planned the counter attack. Months later the Japanese attacked. They lost all four aircraft carriers, and the U.S only lost the USS Yorktown along with other ships.


After The Battle of Midway, both the U.S and Japanese replaced its losses and went back to war. The United States claimed territory called the Pacific Islands. The Battle of Midway is still considered to this day the turning point in World War II in the Pacific Campaign.

FIRST HAND ACCOUNT

“I was floating in the South Pacific Ocean, for 16 hours, hanging onto a life raft,” said Fabian, of Charlestown, R.I. “There were no sharks, but I remember getting hit on the hand by something in the water. It must have been a Portuguese Man o’ War."

FACTS AND STATISTICS

  • At the Battle of Midway the total casualties between Japan And the U.S there was a total of 3,364 deaths


U.S. vs Japan
3 carriers vs. 4 carriers
7 heavy cruisers vs. 2 battleships
1 Light cruiser vs. 2 heavy cruisers
15 destroyers vs. 1 Light cruiser
350 aircraft vs. 12 destroyers
16 subs vs. 248 aircraft
16 float planes


Loses
U.S. vs Japan
1 carrier vs. 4 carriers
1 destroyer vs. 2 heavy cruiser
130 aircraft vs. 248 aircraft
307 deaths vs. 3,057 deaths

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Veteran Reflects on Battle of Midway." The Flagship. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2016.


"Battle of Midway." - Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2016.


"Battle of Midway Begins." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.


"FLETCHER-FRANK." FLETCHER-FRANK. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2016.


"Isoroku Yamamoto." - Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2016.


"USS Yorktown (CV-10)." - Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2016.


"Battle of Midway Ends." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2016.