Atchison Alternative School

Indicator 3.12, Indicator 4.6, Indicator 5.1, 5.4

Work Keys Summary

Students at Atchison Alternative School participate in WorkKeys testing. WorkKeys is an assessment that measures foundational skills students may need to enter the work force. The WorkKeys is also used at the area technical college as a tool for acceptance into programs that are offered.


AAS started this assessment in the spring of 2014. We tested seniors that year. During the 2014 – 2015, school year we tested all high school students. To date, students have done the fall testing of the 2015 – 2016 school year. There are some things to consider with this data – the students do not stay the same. As was mentioned before, our enrollment is very fluid and the same students do not always test.


Looking at the data does help – we can come up with some strategies that are helpful for all of our students:

· Strategy 1 – All students must read – the WorkKeys is an assessment that measures skills need for the work place. This assessment will help students see that reading is imperative.

· Strategy 2 – Close reading, organizing terms in categories – students must realize in the work world each business has it’s own “language”. Helping them find the clues to word meanings will help them.

· Strategy 3 – Vocabulary – students need to know vocabulary terms to navigate many situations. We need to give them a basic understand of vocabulary.


READING

Fourteen percent of the seniors tested in the spring of 2014 scored at level 3. In fall testing of 2014, sixteen percent of our students scored at a level 3 and in the spring testing of 2015, thirteen percent of our students scored at level 3. In the fall testing of 2015, seventeen percent of our students scored at a level 3.

· Students at level 3 are able to read basic materials that are short and simple. Those students would be able to identify main ideas, clearly stated details, and choose the correct meaning of a word. They would also be able to perform each step in a short series of steps and to apply instructions in a situation.

Twenty -nine percent of our students tested in the spring of 2014 scored at level 4. In fall testing of 2014, forty -two percent of our students scored at level 4 and in the spring testing of 2015, thirty- eight percent of our students scored at level 4. In the fall testing of 2015, sixty percent of our students scored at a level 4.

· Students at level 4 would be able to read straightforward material with longer sentences and a number of details. They would be able to identify important details that may not be clearly stated and be able to use the reading material to figure out the meaning of words that are not defined. They would be able to apply instructions with several steps and be able to choose what to do when changing conditions call for different actions.

Seventeen percent of our students tested in the spring of 2014 scored at a level 5. In fall testing of 2014, thirty -two percent of our students scored at level 5 and in the spring testing of 2015, forty -two percent of our students scored at level 5. I n the fall testing of 2015, thirteen percent of our students scored at a level 5.

· Students at this level would be able to read information that has many details that may contain jargon, technical terms, acronyms or words with several meanings. They would be able to figure out the correct meaning of a word based on how the word is used, how to apply technical terms and jargon to stated situations and how to apply complex instructions that include conditionals to situations described in the materials.

Eleven percent of our students tested in the spring of 2014, scored at a level 6. In fall testing of 2014, five percent of our students scored at level 6 and in spring testing of 2015, four percent of our students scored at level 6. In the fall testing of 2015, four percent of our students scored at a level 6.

· Students at this level are able to read materials that include elaborate procedures, complicated information with difficult words, jargon and technical terms. They would be able to identify implied details, use technical terms and jargon in new situations, apply complicated instructions to new situations, apply general principles from the materials to similar and new situations and explain the rational behind a procedure, policy or communication.

Students who tested in the spring of 2014 did not reach level 7. In fall testing of 2014, five percent of our students tested scored at level 7 and in the spring of 2015, four percent of our students tested scored at level 7.

· Students at level 7 are able to read very complex reading materials with many details and complicated concepts. Difficult vocabulary, unusual jargon and technical terms are used but not defined and readers must draw conclusions from some parts of the reading and apply them to other parts. Students are able to figure out the definitions of difficult, uncommon words, the meaning or jargon or technical terms based on how they are used. Students are also able to figure out the general principles behind policies and apply them to situations that are quite different from any described in the materials.


MATH

During the spring of 2014, we did not test WorkKeys math.

In fall testing of 2014, thirty- three percent of our students tested scored at level 3 and in the spring of 2015, forty -eight percent of our students tested scored at level 3. In the fall testing of 2015, seventy-two percent of our students scored at a level 3.

· Students at level 3 can easily translate a word problem to a math equations, they can solve problems that require a single type of mathematics operation, add or subtract negative numbers and change numbers from one for to another using whole numbers, fractions, decimals or percentages. Students are also able to convert simple money and time units.

In fall testing of 2014, forty-two percent of our students tested scored at level 4 and in the spring of 2015, thirty -eight percent of our students tested scored at level 4. In the fall testing of 2015, fourteen percent of our students scored at a level 4.

· Students at level 4 can solve problems when the information may be presented out of order, when it includes extra, unnecessary information and when it might include a simple chart or diagram or graph. Students are able to solve the following type of problems: problems that require one or two operations, negative numbers, averages, simple ratios, simple proportions or rates using whole numbers and decimals. They are able to add fractions, decimals, or percentages and add up to three fractions that share a common denominator. Students are able to multiply a mixed number by a whole number or decimal, put information in the right order before performing calculations, solve problems that require a single type of mathematics operation using whole numbers.

In fall testing of 2014, seventeen percent of our students tested scored at level 5 and in the spring of 2015, twenty four percent of our students tested scored at level 5. In the fall testing of 2015, fourteen percent of our students scored at a level 5.

· Students at level 5 can perform tasks from level 3 and 4, plus they can solve problems that require steps of logic and calculation. They can decide what information, calculations, or unit conversions to use to solve the problem, look up a formula and perform single-step conversions within or between systems of measurement, calculate using mixed units and devide negative numbers. Students can also find the best deal using one and two step calculations and then compare results. Students might also have to calculate perimeters and areas of basic shapes.

In fall testing of 2014, eleven percent of our students tested scored at level 6 and in the spring of 2015, none of our students tested scored at level 6.

· Students at level 6 can perform tasks from levels 3, 4, and 5. Problems at level 6 may require considerable translation from verbal form to mathematical expression and require considerable setup and involve multiple-step calculations. Students need to use fractions, negative numbers, ratios, percentages and mixed numbers to solve problems and well as rearrange a formula. They might also use two formulas to change from one unit to another within the same system of measurement. Students will also be able to find areas of basic shapes when it may be necessary to rearrange the formulas, convert units of measurement in the calculations, or use the result in further calculations.

GED Science

The GED science test from Mc-Graw Hill Online site was used as an initial test. Tests that depend on memorization of facts were rejected. The GED test was written to evaluate science comprehension, both written and graph/chart/diagram. Also, the GED test was chosen because some of the students consider the possibility of dropping out of school and getting a GED; and this test gives them an idea of what they would be looking at. The test had 25 questions and the results were reviewed. Scores ranged from 7/25 to 17/25. Each incorrect answer was charted and analyzed. The most commonly missed questions are identified on the following chart.

(Number of incorrect

responses)

Type of Question

1

0

2

0

3

1

4

4

Find best summary from all true statements

5

1

6

3

7

2

8

3

9

4

Read chart

10

3

11

5

Combining information from paragraph and diagram

12

1

13

5

Following step by step directions

14

3

15

3

16

5

Reading a graph for information NOT included

17

1

18

1

19

5

Best summary of graph

20

1

21

3

22

5

Predicting

23

4

24

2

25

2

GED Reading

Students in English classes were asked to take the GED Reading assessment for the class year of 2015-16. The GED Reading selections are used as a base line for what some students may want to take as a final step in education in the future. It is composed of excerpts from fiction and nonfiction. Each excerpt is followed by multiple-choice questions about the reading material.

Students were to read each excerpt first and then answer the questions following it. They could refer back to the reading material as often as necessary in answering the questions.

Each excerpt was preceded by a "purpose question." The purpose question gave a reason for reading the material. They used these purpose questions to help focus their reading. They were not required to answer these purpose questions. Those purpose questions were given only to help students concentrate on the ideas presented in the reading material.

Students were to answer the 20 questions on this test in 33 minutes or less.

Results are based on students that were in class on the first week of school, August of 2015. These students are not all with us at this time.

RESULTS: 12 total students took the GED English/Prep and Reading Assessment on line. Scores were sent back to the school.

Under 50%- 2 students

51-60%- 3 students

61-70 %-3 students

71-80%- 2 students

2 Students were absent and did not to make up the test.

List of Supports for AAS

7 Certified Teachers


3 Special Education Teachers

  • 1 High School
  • 1 Middle School
  • 1 Elementary

· 1 English Teacher

· 1 Social Science Teacher

· 1 Math Teacher

· 1 Science Teacher

1 Honors Lab Teacher

(Students do Virtual Prescriptive Learning classes)

5 Para Professionals

  • 1 High School Para
  • 4 Academy Paras

1 School Safety Officer/Interventionist

4 Atchison Guidance Center Staff Members

  • 1 Clinical Psychologist
  • Will provide services for our high school students if needed
  • 3 Case Workers

(Serve students in the Academy Program)