August Update

Here's what's coming up this month...

Humanities

Hey everyone! Check out what we will be learning in Reading and Writing this month...
  • Identify key details in a text
  • Ask who, what, when, where, why, and how questions in fiction and nonfiction text.
  • Answer who, what, when, where, why, and how questions in fiction and nonfiction text.
  • Write narrative stories (story you make up) that have a series of events.
  • Use temporal words (first, next, last) in stories.


Standards Addressed:


  • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.


Learning Guide Notes:

Asking questions may seem like an easy concept, however it can also be quite complex. Readers need to evaluate the type of text they are reading to ask appropriate questions. For example, a non-fiction text will generate different types of questions than a fiction text. It is important for students to be able to generate questions on their own rather than only being able to answer questions (this is more difficult for students).

When students are writing narratives, make sure they are using details when writing.

Temporal words - First, Next, Then, Last, Finally

STEAM

Hey everyone! Check out what we will be learning in Math and Science this month...


  • Identify digits in the hundreds, tens, and ones places
  • Identify the value of each digit in the hundreds, tens, and ones places
  • 4 different ways to write numbers
  • Compare 3 digit numbers
  • Identify living and non living things
  • Identify the needs of living things



Standards Addressed:


  • Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
  • Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.


  • Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.


Learning Guide Notes:



We will be using a math tool kit for these lessons. Materials for the tool kit will be available via download or at the eSchool office. Be sure to check out the weekly overviews for additional strategies and tips for overcoming common misconceptions.

We will be exploring living things in their natural habitats so outside time will happen...get your sunscreen and water ready. :)