Parent Information Seminar

Welcome! We are so happy you are here!

Definition of Dyslexia

As defined by the International Dyslexia Association:

Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experiences that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.

You might be dyslexic if..........

You May Be Dyslexic If...
Dyslexia: A Hidden Disability

Let's take a closer look!

"Dyslexia is a specific learning Disability"


  • One specific type of learning disability
  • Not the same as the term “learning disability” that qualifies a student for special education
  • However 80% of students with a learning disability have a reading problem
  • May exist along with other conditions such as ADHD or an oral language disorder


neurological in origin


  • When a person has dyslexia, processes language differently.
  • These differences have been shown in fMRI studies of the brain.


“characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling”


  • The student misreads common words
  • The students stumbles over words when reading.
  • A student may read a word correctly one time and then misread it another time.
  • The student misspells common words and has problems using spelling rules.


difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language



  • The “phonological component” is the sound system of our language.
  • Problems with these skills lead to problems in learning to read.
  • So, surprisingly, intelligence does not always lead to strong reading skills.
  • This explains why a child who does well in other areas can struggle with reading.


unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction



  • It is a surprise that the child struggles to read
  • Good reading is not predicted by:


Age

Intelligence

Other abilities in school


  • Good classroom instruction is important


****Watching how the student responses to good instruction can lead to earlier intervention.****

Indications of STRENGTH in higher-level thinking skills!

•Curiosity

•A great imagination

•The ability to figure things out

•Eager embrace of new ideas

•Getting the gist of things

•A good understanding of new concepts

•A large vocabulary for the age group

•Enjoyment in solving puzzles

•Talent at building models

•Excellent comprehension of stories read or told to him


Many, many, more..........

What we need from you at home.....

  • Your child will have "Take Flight" homework. It shouldn't take more than 5-10 minutes each night. "Take Flight" is the curriculum that we use in the dyslexia program. It is written by the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital. This curriculum contains the five components of effective reading instruction identified by research from the National Reading Panel.

~ Phonemic Awareness

~ Phonics

~ Reading Fluency

~ Vocabulary Development

~ Text Comprehension


http://www.scsk12.org/scs/subject-areas/kweb/images/nationalreadingpanel_faq.pdf



  • He or she will also need to read each night. This can be done using Learning Ally, you reading to your child, or your child reading aloud to you. Please don't let this be a stressful time for you and your child. If they're tired from a long day at school just let them listen and follow along.

Quick Glance at homework and classwork.....

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Sally Shaywitz is GREAT! Anything she publishes about dyslexia is highly creditable.

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Learning Ally!

We are going to train your child how to use Learning Ally at school. If your child has a device (ipad, iphone, computer) available to them at home please consider downloading the app so that your child will be able to use it at home as well. If your child does not have access to a device at home please let us know and we can help with that.
Dr. Sally Shaywitz on Dyslexia, Assistive Tech and Learning Ally

Online Chat with Dr. Sally Shaywitz

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/online-chat-dr-sally-shaywitz


Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Parents of a dyslexic child can be their child's biggest helper. I think the best way to help is to work with your child to improve his or her ability to read fluently rapidly, as well as accurately.


To do this means sitting down with your child, selecting a book to read together that is easy and interesting to the child and for you to read aloud (a passage or a page) to your child and then have your child read the same passage back to you. If he or she has made errors, correct them gently, and have the reread the passage. The practice of repeated oral reading with feedback and guidance allows the brain to practice and build and re-enforce the circuits necessary for fluent reading. You can also use poems or pretend you are acting out a play – plays require reading aloud and rereading, an excellent vehicle to practice fluency.