Infectious Diseases

By: Paige Meyers

How have Cultural Beliefs Impacted the Spread of Ebola?

Some residents in West African area do not want the public to know that they have this infectious disease, Ebola. These people will go as far as hiding in their houses, which gets their families infected instead of telling anyone that they were infected, and getting treated for it.
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In West Africa:

The language West Africans speak is Swahili. This creates a Language Barrier when the United States of America sends over Help/aid to West Africa, they had to find a different form of communication because of the language barrier.
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How did West Africans get treated for ebola?

There has not been an FDA (First Division Association) approved vaccine for Ebola.


These symptoms of Ebola are treated as they appear to be seen on ones body or in ones health.


The main way that these Healthcare workers are treating Ebola is by


  • Providing an IV (intravenous Fluids) and maintaining ones Body Salts (Electrolytes)
  • Keeping oxygen in their body as well as keeping up their blood pressure.
  • Treating other infections if they start to happen in ones body.

Extra Information

If you are interested in knowing more about Ebola, and what it is, and why the United States worried so much about what Ebola is, visit my website at: https://sites.google.com/a/kmsd.edu/paige-m/home

About the Author

Hi, my name is Paige. I am a Sophomore at Kettle Moraine High School. I joined a Charter school this year called KM Global.

KM Global is a charter school for Globalized Leadership and Innovation.

If you would like to know more about KM Global go to:

http://www.kmsd.edu/KMGlobal.cfm?subpage=1213270

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Cited Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Web. 08 Jan. 2015. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5021a1.htm



Masterson, Karen M. "Plagues on the Poor: What Ebola Can Learn From Malaria." Ebola. Time, 2 Oct. 2014. Web. 18 Nov. 2014. https://time.com/3453907/plagues-ebola-malaria-research/


MD, Men-Jean Lee. "Cultural Beliefs and Health Practices." School of Medicine. Indiana University, n.d. Web. 17 Nov. 2014. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CCwQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.in.gov%2Fisdh%2Ffiles%2FRELIGION_AND_MEDICINE_ISDH_Final.pdf&ei=4adPVJGXFs2GyAS94IKgDw&usg=AFQjCNEAPA0R6f1zOq_KiOaUeC7KintXMw&sig2=-hmUOXBACWwrQ_ks2CWLMw&bvm=bv.77880786,d.aWw


"About Ebola Virus Disease." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 03 Oct. 2014. Web. 29 Oct. 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/about.html


"About Ebola Virus Disease." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 03 Oct. 2014. Web. 29 Oct. 2014. http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/about.html


"Ebola: Mapping the Outbreak." BBC News. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Oct. 2014. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-28755033