Annotated Timeline Project

by Jonathan Wilkinson

1st Election

The 1st Election was held from Monday, December 15, 1788 to Saturday, January 10, 1789. There is a Destiny which has the control of our actions, not to be resisted by the strongest efforts of Human Nature. -George Washington.
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What do we call our leader

George Washington was sworn in on April 30, 1787 in N.Y.C. There was a debate on what the leader of the U.S. would be called. Washington ended the argument by telling them that he would be called, "Mr. President."
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Judiciary Act

In the Judiciary Act of 1789, the First Congress provided the detailed organization of a federal judiciary that the Constitution had sketched only in general terms. Acting on its constitutional authority to establish inferior courts, the Congress instituted a three-part judiciary.
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President’s Precedents

  • First inauguration in Philadelphia, PA

  • Delivered the shortest inaugural address at just 135 words

  • First Inauguration

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Whiskey Rebellion

The Whiskey Rebellion, also known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a tax protest in the United States beginning in 1791, during the presidency of George Washington. The so-called "whiskey tax" was the first tax imposed on a domestic product by the newly formed federal government. It became law in 1791, and was intended to generate revenue to help reduce the national debt.
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Founding our Nation’s Capital

Like so many other elements of the new nation, even the most basic features of the capital city were unsettled. President Washington first took office in NEW YORK CITY, but, when reelected in 1792, the capital had already moved to Philadelphia where it would remain for a decade. Fittingly, Jefferson was the first president to be inaugurated in the new and lasting capital of Washington, D.C. in March 1801.
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National Bank

The First Bank of the United States was a central bank, chartered for a term of twenty years, by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791.
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Political Parties

Political scientists and historians have divided the development of America's two-party system into five eras.[3] The modern two-party system consists of the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. Several third parties also operate in the U.S., and from time to time elect someone to local office. The largest third party since the 1980's is the Libertarian Party.
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George’s Farewell

Milestones: 1784–1800. Washington's Farewell Address, 1796. To announce his decision not to seek a third term as President, George Washington presented his Farewell Address in a newspaper article September 17, 1796.
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