Ancient Rome FAQ

Juno Janke

Writing

In ancient Rome they didn't have modern day paper, instead they used something very similar called Papyrus. This was made from the Egyptian plant of the same name. To write on papyrus they would use a quill dipped in ink. However, it was very hard and expensive to make. Most Romans would just use a wooden tablet with a thin layer of wax and a stylus.

Family

In a typical roman family there was a father, mother, children, and their slaves. The head of the family, or the Paterfamilias, was the father or oldest living male in the family. He held all power of the family and he owned his children. He also chose whether or not to keep and raise his child; If he chose not to then they where left out in the elements to die. The children that where usually left to die where the girls for having a boy was a sign the gods had blessed the marriage.

Romans had three names, a praenomen, a nomen and a cognomen. The slaves of the family where only given one name. The girls where all named after their fathers while the boys had their own names.

Men and Boy's Clothing

In ancient Rome men and boys would wear the garnet called a toga. In order to wear a toga you had to be at least 16 years old and a free citizen. Poor men would wear shorter togas to save money while rich men would wear long big togas as a sign of wealth. Men also would wear a ring that was used to make an impression in sealing wax in order to authorize documents. This was one of the only pieces of jewelry men would wear.

Women and Girl's

In ancient Rome women would wear a Stola beneath a cloak called a Palla. Also known as just a tunic and a toga. Most women would sew a piece of purple fabric into their clothing to ward of evil.

Citations

  • "Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

  • "Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


  • "Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


  • WEISS, JESSICA. "Fathering and Fatherhood." Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood: In History and Society. Ed. Paula S. Fass. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 348-353. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.



  • "Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


  • Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.



  • "Roman Clothing." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear Through the Ages. Ed. Sara Pendergast, et al. 2nd ed. Vol. 1: The Ancient World. Detroit: UXL, 2013. 157-174. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


  • McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.