Soda or Powder?

By: Makayla Forsberg

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Purpose Statement

The purpose of this experiment was to find out if baking soda can substitute for baking powder in a recipe. I became interested in this experiment because I like to bake, and it would help me to know in the future if I could use either one for baking! The information gained from this experiment will help others by letting them know if baking powder would substitute for baking soda.

Research

When baking soda is mixed with an acidic ingredient, it creates carbon dioxide gas. It expands in the heat of the oven. It helps the cookies, cakes, etc. to rise. Baking powder is made from alkali, bicarbonate of soda, and acid cream of tartar, and a filler like cornflour or rice flour which makes it absorb moisture.

Baking powder is baking soda already mixed with an acid. Baking powder on its own is used in baked goods that DO not already contain an acid. Baking powder and baking soda are both leaveners, but they are chemically different.

PICTURES OF ORIGINAL RECIPE

PICTURES OF THE CHANGED RECIPE

Hypothesis

My hypothesis is it is possible to substitute baking soda and baking powder! I base my hypothesis on the ingredients that are in both baking soda and baking powder.

Materials

baking powder

baking soda

cooking supplies

ingredients for the recipe I choose

Procedures

1. Find a recipe that has baking soda or baking powder in it.

2. Get ingredients.

3. Make the recipe and substitute baking powder/baking soda instead of using the one the recipe calls for.

4. Determine the height, color, taste, and texture of the baked good.

5. Do this again, but bake the recipe correctly.

6. Repeat step 4.

Observations Log/Data

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Results

The purpose of this experiment was to find out if baking soda can substitute for baking powder in a recipe. The results show that there were small changes, but not enough to make it so you couldn't eat it.
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Conclusion

My hypothesis was it is possible to substitute baking soda and baking powder. The results indicate that this hypothesis should be considered true. Based on the results of this experiment, if you didn't have baking soda, baking powder would work just fine. If I were to conduct this science fair project again I would test different characteristics of the cookie to test.

Acknowlegements

Mike Forsberg

Kim Forsberg

Mason Forsberg

Megan Forsberg

Miles Forsberg