Lead

By: Jae-hoon Choi

Basic

  • Element-Lead
  • Symbol- Pb
  • Atomic Number- 82
  • Atomic Weight- 207.2
  • Group- 14 (No Name)
  • Color- Blueish white
  • Classification- Post-transition metal

History

  • Lead was discovered by known since ancient times in unknown at not known
  • Lead was known to the people for many and many of centuries.
  • Alchemists believed lead to be the oldest metal and associated it with the planet Saturn. They spent a lot of time trying to "transmute" lead into gold.
  • Lead is ne of the elements which has an alchemical symbol as shown in on the right.

Uses

  • Lead pipes bearing the insignia of Roman emperors, used as drains from the baths, are still in service.
  • The majority of lead produced today is used in lead-acid batteries. These types of batteries are used in cars because of their low cost and high power.
  • Because lead is resistant to corrosion, has such a high density, and is relatively inexpensive, it is used in water applications such as weights for scuba divers and ballasts for sailboats.
  • Other applications that use lead include roofing material, electrolysis, statues, solder for electronics, and ammunition
  • . Tetraethyl lead is still used in some grades of petrol (gasoline) but is being phased out on environmental grounds.

Description

  • Under standard conditions lead is a soft silvery metal with a bluish tint.
  • It becomes a darker gray after coming into contact with air.
  • It is very malleable (can be pounded into a thin sheet) and ductile (can be stretched into a long wire).
  • Lead is a poor electrical conductor when compared to other metals.

Biology (In Humans)

  • Lead has no biological role.
  • Lead affects the gut, central nervous system and causes anemia
  • Too much lead in the body can cause lead poisoning.
  • Lead can accumulate in the body's bones and soft tissues.
  • If too much accumulates it will damage the nervous system and can cause brain disorders.
  • Lead is toxic to many of the body's organs including the heart, kidneys, and intestines. Too much lead can cause headaches, confusion, seizures, and even death.

Geology (In the Universe)

  • Lead can be found in the Earth's crust in its free form, but it is mostly found in ores with other metals such as zinc, silver, and copper.
  • There isn't a high concentration of lead in the Earth's crust, it is fairly easy to mine and refine.

Properties

  • Under standard conditions lead is a soft silvery metal with a bluish tint.
  • It becomes a darker gray after coming into contact with air.
  • It is very malleable (can be pounded into a thin sheet) and ductile (can be stretched into a long wire).
  • Lead is a poor electrical conductor when compared to other metals.

Interesting Facts

  • For many years lead and tin were thought to be the same metal. Lead was called "plum bum nigrum" for black lead and tin was called "plum bum album" for white lead.
  • Over one million tons of lead is recycled each year.
  • People have known about lead poisoning since Ancient China and Ancient Greece.
  • The element is a member of the carbon group (column 14) in the periodic table.
  • Alchemists associated it with the planet Saturn.
  • Around 98% of all lead-acid batteries are recycled.
  • Lead is an Anglo-Saxon word for the metal that has been used and known about since ancient times.
  • The symbol Pb comes from the Latin word for lead, "plum bum."
  • The Romans used lead for making pipes, which is where the word "plumber" comes from as well.